Posted in Ancestry, England, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Jewish History, London

Jack Hyamovitch (Hyams)

Jack Hyamovitch was born on June 28, 1908, London, England to Marks and Polly Hyamovitch. He was the 4th child, the 4th son born to them. Jack was my 1st cousin 2x removed. The picture below is one of the earliest known photo’s of the family and you can see Jack seated next to Polly. The year is most likely about 1910.

Hyamovitch1 copy                       All Photo’s Courtesy of The Weiss Family Collection

 Jack Hyamovitch 

JackHyamovitch1 copy

I believe this is Jack a bit older – but I can not be sure.

JackHyamovitch2 copy

I have very little to no information on Jack and his early years and life. He would marry two times. His first marriage was to Alice Thorpe. From Ancestry.com  England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1916-2005  I found this record for his marriage.

Name: Jack Hyamovitch
Registration Date: Jul 1932
[Aug 1932] 
[Sep 1932] 
Registration Quarter: Jul-Aug-Sep
Registration district: West Ham
Inferred County: Essex
Spouse: Alice Thorpe

Unfortunately at this time there is no other information to identify who her parents were.

Born to Alice in June of 1931 was daughter Beryl K. It is unclear to me if in fact she was the daughter of Jack. Notice she was born one year prior to their marriage. Alice and Jack  did have a confirmed daughter, Marie, born 19 Sept. 1933, West Ham, Essex.

Two marriages were found for Beryl, the first to Kenneth Bishop and a second to Robert E. Browne, 1950 (Jan-Feb-Mar) in Islington, London.

I could find no marriage record for daughter Marie.

Jack’s second marriage was to Louise Silver (Davyatski) (according to a researcher on Ancestry with this family, Louise’s parents were Ruben and Sarah with a last name of (Davyatski) changed to Silver)

I was unable to find a record for their marriage using both Ancestry and FamilySearch, under Silver or Davyatski,  Haimovitch or Hyams. Their first child, a son named Jeffrey Hyams was born 18 Feb. 1938, Stepney, London. Benjamin followed on 26 Mar. 1939, Bethnal Green, Middlesex, then Myrna born on Feb. 24th, 1941 in Herefordshire and their last child, another son, Melvyn, 4 May 1943 in Luton, Bedforshire.

Locating the 1939 England and Wales Register for Jack Hyamovitch  on Ancestry, I found him listed living with Louise’s parents

Jack1939Census

What I found most interesting was that only Jack was listed and not Louise. It states he was born June 18, 1908,  (could be a typo as we have the 28) married and a carpenter. He is listed with Rubin Silver, 2 Oct, 1880, a fur nailer and Sarah Silver, 2 July, 1884, unpaid domestic duties. So where was Louise and first son Jeffrey?

I decided to do a quick check on ancestry for Louise and actually found her under the name Louise Hyams under the 1939 England and Wales Register Norfolk > New Huntstanton >UD > TQGB The birthdate of 11 Aug. 1914 confirmed this was her. She was working as an unpaid domestic duties @ 42 Victoria Ave listed under Harry J. Bennet, gardener, Kate E., unpaid domestic duties and a Phyllis Bennett, unpaid domestic duties and part time grocery bookkeeper, along with a William J. Rennie

LouiseHyams

So my thoughts jump to why was she not living with her husband and parents? Does unpaid actually mean unpaid and if so why again would she be working for a family and not getting paid? Where was her first son Jeffrey who would only have been 1 years old? He was not listed with either Jack or Louise.

Trying to learn just what was meant by unpaid domestic duties, I turned to google with a search for just that on the 1939 England and Wales Register. According to walesonline.co.uk 1939 was one of the most important records at the beginning for WWII,

“In just one day 65,000 enumerators were employed to visit every house in England and Wales to take stock of the 41 million strong civil population.

The information that they recorded was used to issue Identity Cards, plan mass evacuations, establish rationing and co-ordinate other wartime provisions.

In the longer term, the 1939 Register would go on to play a central role in the establishment of post-war services like the NHS.

As well as being a vital document at the time, the register is also set to be a resource of huge historic importance. Due to the 1921 census not being publicly available, the 1931 census having been destroyed during the war and the 1941 census not being taken because of the war the 1939 Register bridges a hitherto vacant period between 1911 and 1951″ 

No.1 under top professions for woman was “unpaid domestic duties” I was unable to find a suitable reason as to why Louise would be in the home of anther family carrying out the duties of an unpaid domestic  which simply ‘refers to a housewife’.

Which brings up the question of when the Hyamovitch family changed their last name and started using Hyams. In 1939 Marks and Polly were listed with the Hyamovitch, son Sam had Hyamovitch but it was crossed out and Hyams was replaced. Philip was interesting as he was first listed as Phil Hyams which was crossed out and Hyamovitch, Phil was written then o/w Phil Hyams with an additional notation

PhilipHyams1939Register

We saw above that Jack was listed under Hyamovitch, and I was unable to find a record for Harry or Hyman.  As late as July of 1947 Sam was still using Hyamovitch when he married Fanny Kaplan/Isaacson, in 1940 Hyman was using Hyamovitch … I could go on, it appears the name change may have been on an individual basis and not one instituted by their father Marks. I would love to hear from a family member on this.

Getting back to Jack – he was a carpenter like his father Marks and Uncle Samuel. I do not have any more information on him.

Jack Hyamovitch Hyams born 28 June 1908 passed away o March 7, 1960 in Skegness, Lincolnshire, England at the age of 52.

HIs children ranged in the ages of 27-17 years old when he passed.

I have no information at this time on what became of Louise his second wife.

 

Author:

An adoptee who found both her maternal and paternal side 17 years ago, I began digging into my new found families past. The journey has been amazing connecting and reconnecting lost and found generations.

12 thoughts on “Jack Hyamovitch (Hyams)

  1. Wow, that’s so interesting! It’s the unanswered questions that always tease us. Had we lived in 1939, we’d probably have known exactly what that unpaid domestic duties meant. If England’s economy had spiraled down like ours, I could imagine her working for room and board, perhaps. This was before the German blitzkrieg of Sept. 1940-May 1941, so I wouldn’t think Jeremy had already been sent out into the country to relatives or strangers. This is a great puzzle. I hope you find some clues and an eventual answer to at least some of the questions.

  2. I wonder whether this was out of economic necessity—that she got free room and board (but not a salary) for taking care of the household? Or was there trouble in the marriage? Hard to know…. Good digging, Sharon!

  3. Did Louise go to live with relatives? That would be my first guess. This is where we need to get a time machine to get the info we want!!! All the children look adorable!!!!

  4. Hi Sharon, these photos are fantastic! “Unpaid domestic duties” was often used to describe an unemployed woman or housewife. I’ve got several in my family who were living with their husbands and children who are noted as “unpaid domestic duties”. If they were younger women aged about 14-16 and living with another family, they might be described as servants but they weren’t servants as we’d describe them today, just not employed outside a home and living there to help with a large family. Avis

    1. Thank you Avis for stopping by and for the wonderful explanation for “unpaid domestic duties”. I totally agree about these photos. They are so fantastic and in such great shape too. So thankful to the Weiss Family for sharing them 🙂

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