Posted in Ancestry, Galati, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Iasi, New York, Romania, Srulowitz, Strulowitz

Srulowitz, Strulowitz, Strolowitz, vitz, vic, vici, vitch and every variation

Still standing in our families story is the Srulowitz/Strulowitz brick wall. (I will be using the spelling of Srulowitz as this seems to be the most common spelling in my records)

Who, where, what happened to you, sister of Rebecca Srulowitz born abt. 1885 in Romania? Rebecca married Samuel Haimowitz in Romania. Their first son was Hyman (Herman) born 1898, Iasi, followed by Pincus (Paul),1901, Galati. I have not been able to find the families immigration record but my best guess, based on records, is 1902. Daughter Freda (Fay), 1902/3, Isidore Irving (my grandfather) 1904, and Molly 1911, were all born in N.Y.C.. Rebecca’s death certificate said she was 51 when she passed away on Jan 4, 1937. Rebecca was laid to rest at Mt. Zion Cemetery, N.Y. on the following day. Her parents were listed as Samuel (sp) Strolowitz and Minnie Cohen, both from Romania.

Missing sister, family remembrances have you known as Minnie Srulowitz (same as your mom), you married and had at least 2 daughters, one of which was named Molly, who was known as “red headed Molly” so she wouldn’t be confused with her cousin Molly Haimowitz who married Louis Petchers in 1933, N.Y.C.. This memory indicates to me there must have been a close family connection of some kind as there could be confusion.

As I continue my search to break down this wall, I have been able to identify many DNA cousin. I have worked on fleshing out their trees, comparing dates, ordering death and marriage certificates to look for parental names but I have not been able to identify with any certainty these family connections.

While the brick wall still stands, it’s not to say I haven’t discovered interesting and fun information and facts on Srulowitz’s. Like the most recent one below for Sidney Srulowitz and his feather beds that became hand sewn quilts.

Sidney Quilt Shop

The Standard Union Brooklyn New York 04 May 1929, Page 17

In paragraph 2 it starts “Handmade Quilts are a specialty of Sidney’s Quilt Shop”. This article caught my eye because I am a hand quilter. His quilt speciality of course could have been machine stitched but the fact it didn’t say ‘machinemade’ peeked my interest. I began hand quilting in the mid 70’s. Below are 2 of 4 quilts I made this past year, 2020.

The question became, who was Sidney Srulowitz and was there a possibility he could be related to my Rebecca?

I began with a search of public member trees on Ancestry for him and identified 4 different Sidney’s, 1 married to Rose, Fanny, Evelyn and a Rhoda. Sidney (last name Small) jumped out at me because his parents were listed Isidore Srulowitz and Gussie Silverman and that seemed familiar to me. Checking census records showed Sidney, married to Rose was the proprietor of a leather shop but his WWII Draft registration record listed his occupation as “Self, Sidney’s Quilt Shop ” Long Island City.

Sidney Srulowitz was born 19 Oct. 1907, N.Y. He was the son of Isidore Srulowitz born abt. 1884, Romania, died 21 Jan. 1940, Manhattan, N.Y. and Gussie Silverman born abt. 1888, Romania died 28 Aug. 1945, N.Y.. Sidney and Gussie had 9 children, Sidney the oldest followed by Miriam 1909, Irving Maxwell 1910, Paul 1913, Mollie 1916, Joseph 1917, Hyman 1920, Edith Yetta 1923, and Charles 1927. Noted here: it appears all the male children changed their last name to Small sometime around 1940.

Once I discovered Sidney’s father was Isidore my question in researching became, could Isidore be a brother to my Rebecca making her Sidneys Aunt and 1st cousin to my grandfather.

Checking in on father Isidore, he was the original quilter. His WWI draft registration, 1918 lists his occupation as “Quilt Manufacturer in business for himself”. Both his home and business address was listed as 173 Allen Street, N.Y.C.. It also gave his birth date as Dec. 1881. The date corresponds with Rebecca’s estimated birth year of 1885. Checking family search I found his death record with a link to findagrave with his gravestone inscription translated Yehuda, son of Israel David. Isidore is buried at Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Queens, N.Y..

The 1910 census for Isidore and his family provided some additional information. It listed his occupation as a “Quilt Maker” in Industry “Iron Store”, immigration year of 1905 and the spelling of the last name as Strulovitch . Max Strulovitch (21) cutter / mufg. coats was listed as Isidore’s brother and two ‘boarders’ Jake Silverman (19) cutter mufg. quilts and Rose Silverman (17) operator mufg. were also on the census. Although marked boarders, I believe they were the brother and sister of Gussie.

My search for answers had me looking for immigration records for Isidore hoping perhaps I would find a clue as to who they were traveling to, perhaps to a sister Rebecca and husband Samuel Haimowitz ? But I could not locate any records as of this writing.

I went back to searching public member trees to check for DNA matches and any additional clues. One researcher had the parents of Isidore as Samuel Srulowitz and Mollie LNU – that’s was interesting as Rebecca’s death certificate did lists her parents as Samuel and Minnie (Cohen) (There was no documentation to support these parental names) I also had a distant DNA match to two people in one of the trees.

Using the trees on Ancestry, I did discover that Isidore had a confirmed brother named Max Srulowitz married to Yetta Goodman.

I have a few additional steps to take in researching this family. I have ordered the death certificate for Isidore to confirm his father and mothers name, if possible. If the death certificate for Isidore doesn’t show parental names I will default to Max and Yetta’s records, marriage and his death cert. to confirm Samuel and Molly as parents. I am looking for Molly’s last name to be Cohen.

But before I leave you I wanted to remember Gussie (Gittel) Srulowitz nee Silverman, who I discovered passed away in 1945, the results of a terrible car accident.

The Courier-News Bridgewater, New Jersey . 28 Aug 1945, Tues . Page 4
The Standard Union Brooklyn, New York . 04 May 1929 . Sat. Page 17

Notice the address for Pvt. Louis Solnert was listed as ‘same’ as Gussie. In another article it was mentioned that he was her son-in-law and driver Paul’s brother-in-law. I can’t imagine the heartache and pain of Paul and this entire family.

May their memories be a blessing

Author:

An adoptee who found both her maternal and paternal side 18 years ago, I began digging into my new found families past. The journey has been amazing connecting and reconnecting lost and found generations.

12 thoughts on “Srulowitz, Strulowitz, Strolowitz, vitz, vic, vici, vitch and every variation

  1. This looks very promising to find more connections. I’m always saddened by information about deaths that happen like this. I have a relative who died with his wife and 10-year old daughter in a highway accident in Texas, and I always think how young they all were and how much they had to live for – their parents were still living, too. What heartache it must have been. All their memories are a blessing. =)

    1. This does seem to be a promising lead and I am cautiously hopeful. These type of family accidents are so heartbreaking. I can’t even imagine.

  2. The article about the recycling of feather beds into quilts was very interesting. Your dalia quilt is one of the most beautiful I’ve ever seen. You are very talented!

    1. Thank you Liz – that is so sweet about the Dahlia quilt. It is a popular panel that was circulating my quilting circle. I had inspiration from one of the machine quilters with this one on what to do by hand. It was really fun to do 🙂

  3. Your persistence is admirable, and I do hope you can break down this wall in 2021. I want to go back and study this again to see if I can suggest anything you haven’t already tried, which I doubt.

      1. I don’t see anything really. I would never have thought Srulowitz would have been so common, but it does mean son of Israel, so I shouldnt be as surprised. Good luck!!

I would love to hear from you

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.