Posted in DNA, England, Genealogy, Greenblatt, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch

Connecting the Greenblatt Family

From the Social Security application for my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz, I learned that my 2x great grandmother was a woman named Ida Greenblatt (Grinblat) and her husband was Hyman Haimowitz. (from Sam’s death certificate Hyman was written Herman)

Ida was the mother of Samuel and his brother Marks Hyamovitch. The Hyamovitch/Hyams branch remained in London, England while Samuel immigrated to the states, settling in New York.

Next to nothing is known about Ida, her age and place of birth are estimates. Using Samuel’s birth year of 1875, going back 20 years, I have estimated Ida’s birth year about 1855, with a place of birth possibly Odessa, where on some records, Samuel had listed that as his place of birth, the family then moving into Romania where his brother Marks was born 1880 in Iasi.

I have been sitting on DNA matches to others with Greenblatt in their trees for quite some time. I am constantly reevaluating and comparing shared matches with 4 my known cousins off of the Hyamovitch (England) who have tested and known cousins here in the states in hopes of finding a pattern or connection back to Ida. The process has been time consuming and often required me to build the trees for some of these matches. The matches are mostly 4 – 6 generations, then into the 5 – 8 generations back. Almost impossible at times to connect.

Even so, I believe I may have discovered 1 brother of Ida Greenblatt who also immigrated to the United States with his family settling in Michigan.

Building my research:

This brother was a man named Pincus Greenblatt who married to Eva/Edith Broad.

I discovered Pincus and Eva by working off of a 4 -6 DNA match with 2 people to Abraham Greenblatt in their line, I had sent away for his marriage certificate to Fannie Schwartz to learn who his parents were. Abraham married at 27 years which made his birth year 1872, by going back 20 years, I estimated Pincus’s birth year about 1852, in line with Ida’s 1855 birth year.

Once I had the names of Pincus and Eva, I used Ancestry member trees to build their family tree. (all ages and names are from trees and may be incomplete and/or approx and not entirely accurate)

Pincus and Eva/Edith were the parents of Bayla/Bella, Mordecai, Breina/Rebecca b. 1869, Romania who married Israel Schwartz, Esther b. 1870, Romania who married Jacob Escoff, and Abraham b. 1872, Romania who married Fannie Schwartz.

Rebecca and Israel Schwartz were the parents of Max b. 1896 m Leonore Silverman, Harry b. 1892, Edward b. 1892 m Florence Seigel, Sarah b. 1895 m Israel Shemper, Charles b. 1898 m Frieda Chill & Beatrice LNU, (all born in Romania) and Bella b.1909, NYC d. 1903

Esther and Jacob Escoff were the parents of Adolf m Fannie Wilner, Sarah m Max Aronvici, Frank m Pearl, Rebecca/Rae m Benjamin Podolsky, and Isabelle m Jacob Goldhaber, Mollie b. 1898 m Max Smith, Zelda b. 1904 m Charles Tennen, (all born in Romania) and Edith b. 1907 Mich. m Leslie Meltzer and Ida b. 1909 Mich. m Samuel Levin

Abraham Greenblatt and Fannie were the parents of Bella b. 1909 m Edward Schultz, Pincus/Paul b. 1910, Lillian b. 1913 m Jack Blackoff and Annette b. 1922 m Jerome Kinoy (all children born in NYC)

I have (2) 4-6 DNA matches, all shared with my England cousins to Breina/Rebecca to Israel Schwartz and a 4 -6 match to Esther and Jacob Escoff (Ostrow) off of their daughter Rachel/Rae who married Benjamin Podolsky. There is also a 3 – 5 match off of son Abraham Grrenblatt and Fannie Schwartz

In order to understand a little clearer, posted below is a working copy of how I mapped out my notes. I used the individual DNA connected branches to created a tree. Originally I had an individual tree for Esther, Rebecca and Abraham, eventually putting them together to see how they all fit.

In most cases I have I expanded the trees to living descendants using obituary and member trees but have excluded names and information

My research is ongoing and evolving. Hopefully new information and distant cousin connection will either prove this working theory or help explain the family connection.

For now I am cautiously believing that Pincus Greenblatt born abt 1850 is the brother of my 2x great grandmother Ida Greenblatt.

Author:

An adoptee who found both her maternal and paternal side 18 years ago, I began digging into my new found families past. The journey has been amazing connecting and reconnecting lost and found generations.

10 thoughts on “Connecting the Greenblatt Family

  1. Wow, I admire your persistence! I get way too frustrated using DNA matches to try and build my tree, but you are doing a great job. I hope it pays off. What is your next step? You may inspire me to try and do more with all the thousands of distant DNA matches I have!

    1. Thanks Amy for the encouragement ~ I think the next step is really hoping someone spots the blog post and can miraculously confirm this. Outside of that happening, it really is just an educated guess. I will continue to add DNA matches as they come in to this branch and see how it fills out. Like you say there are thousands of matches…almost impossible to connect. I have pages of fleshed out trees with the sir names for the mystery people. Good luck if you try and branch out this way πŸ™‚

  2. Wow, fabulous work. I am always forgetting how valuable it can be to order the social security apps!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. I have never tried to work back from the matches which are all 2-6, even my half sister comes up as a cousin 2 times removed, which I think is strange, since we have the same mother! This looks like a great way to connect people though, and I may have to try it.

I would love to hear from you

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.