Posted in DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Jewish History, New York, Romania

Leon Haimowitz 1876 – 1950

In my last post I wrote about Benjamin Haimowitz, his wife Goldie aka Gussie Stein and their son Abraham aka Al. I was trying to answer the question, who was Benjamin and what happened to him after he divorced Gussie in 1921. I was unable to answer that question but provided all the information I could locate up until that date. Benjamin just seemed to disappear from all published records.

But in trying to answer that question I stumbled upon who I believe was Benjamins brother.

Researching for the Sherman family, I was given access to their ancestry page to take a look at their DNA matches. Hoping to find a clue that way, there were two 4-6 cousin matches that looked promising. One was for a Joseph Haimowitz(1886) m Lena Braumerwitz and one for Leon Haimowitz (1878) m Esther Hausfater. Their ages put them in the age range I had for Benjamin (1878 – 1880) to be siblings or cousin.

I took the information these tree’s had and began to work with Leon, building my own tree for him, gathering the records I could find, working backwards and forwards. (I have not made progress with Joseph)

Leon Haimovici arrived in August 1900 at the age of 22. (this was the same year Benjamin claimed to have arrived) He was born on 15 March,1876 in Braila, Romania. He left from Rotterdam, Holland aboard the SS Spaarndam, however they were not traveling together.

There are actually 2 records for a Leon – ours spelled on the passenger list as Chaimowitz, 22, tinsmith from Braila (matching his marriage and draft record) traveling to a friend (unable to read) The second listing which has been picked up by the other researchers is for a Leon Chaimowics, 28 tailor, married traveling with Sussel (female) 10. Both were traveling on the same ship arriving in August of 1900. It is really important not to just attach record hints that pop up on ancestry. The hint on ancestry defaulted to the wrong Leon. Looking at the hint I was suspicious of it as his profession was tailor, married and there was a young girl but it did not indicate her as a daughter. I started to scan through the pages associated with this voyage and located the correct Leon.

I found a marriage record on ancestry first but there was no information other than his name date and place (the certificate is available to order) I then checked on familysearch and located this record which matched the information that was on the corresponding DNA cousin tree. This gave me the names of Leons parents along with Esthers.

A bit later in my research I located the marriage certificate for Leon and Esther on the site of the DNA match with the Shermans. (I would have loved to have seen Benjamins name as a witness)

I was unable to find them in the 1905 census but located then in 1910 living at 344 Alabama Ave. Brooklyn. Leon (30) and Esther (25) and daughter Celia who had been born (1905), then son Abraham (1906) and Max (1907) Leon listed his occupation as tinsmith– I was really excited about this tinsmith connection with Benjamin who had listed his occupation in 1910 as tinsmith too as well as both arriving in the same year. Was this same occupation a family occupation?

I am out of chronological order but the next record I located was Leon’s Petition For Naturalization dated July 19, 1909. It was on this document that the connection with Benjamin was confirmed.

Under Affidavit of Witnesses was Jacob Steinworzel, father of Goldie/Gussie, Benjamin’s wife with the address confirming it was the right Jacob. It is my assumption that Benjamin’s father-in-law was witness on his brother Leons papers.

New York, U.S., State and federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1943 Ancestry.com

This next document dated April 23, 1914 seems to contradict the 1915 census record information (1915c will follow this) however it is possible that by 1915 the situation had reversed itself and Leon was back in the home.

Below is an application for admission to the New York, U.S., Hebrew Orphan Asylum Records, 1860 – 1934 (Ancestry) for Abraham and Max, their 2nd and 5th born children. Leon had abandoned the family for work and Esther was forced to place two of her children in the orphan home temporarily while she seeked employment. From the explanation below it also appears she had to sell all her household goods for money to survive.

Remarks: Husband of applicant deserted family 11 years ago. His whereabouts unknown. Man had been unsteadily employed before his desertion. Woman intends to seek employment after the children are admitted. She claims that since man went away she has sewed occasionally and earned from $1.50 to $2 per week. She recieved $4.50 for her household effects. No assistance from ( ? ) no relatives able to assist. (I am questioning the desertion of 11 years as an error)

By 1915 Leon shows up at the 105th St. address from above and was on the census. Spelled Himowitz he was (38) and Esther (31) and his occupation was listed simply laborer. Added to the family had been Joseph b. 1910 (Esther must have been pregnant at the time of 1910 census) and Isidore b. 1912. This made 5 children for the family. I also spent some time going through the pages hoping to find Benjamin possibly living close to Leon but had no luck.

But by 1918 the family had relocated to Oregon. The next record found was Leon’s WWI draft registration. He had moved his family and was living at 415 Main St. Oregon City, Oregon. Leon was 42 born Sept. ‘I don’t know’ 1876. He was working as a junk dealer for the Alaska Junk Co.

U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917 – 1918 Ancestry.com

By 1920 if they had truly been together prior, things had changed. I found Esther (35) divorced and all 5 children living at 684 2nd St., Portland. They were renting and Esther was not employed. Celia (15) was working as a waitress in a department store, Abe (13), Max (12) and Isadore (9) were news boys on the street and Joe (7) was spared working. I was unable to locate Leon in 1920

1930 they were still divorced however Esther (47) had moved to 187 Arthur St. Portland and had bought the home. It’s value was $2000. She was working in a garment factory as a coat operator. Still at home was Abe (24) architect in an architect office and Isidore (19) was a bookkeeper in an advertising office. Celia had married Herman Rosenbloom on Feb. 21, 1926, sadly Joseph had died at age 14, on Nov 8, 1926, and Max (23) was in San Francisco working as a chauffeur for a private family.

Leon (54) divorced, was listed as Lane Haimovci on the 1930 census. He was living at 75 Burns St. in West Linn, Oregon. He also owned his home and the value was $2300. He was working on his own account as a salesman in a furniture store.

Leon and Esther must had been on friendly terms because on June 3, 1930 they crossed the Oregon/Washington border and married in Vancouver, WA. One of her witnesses was her daughter Celia Rosenbloom.

However the marriage did not last long and they divorced in Clackamas County, Oregon on November 28, 1930.

By 1940 Leon (65) was working again as a junk dealer in his own business. He owned his home on Kone Street in West Linn, Oregon.

Leon passed away on June 10, 1950 Portland, and is buried at Shaarie Torah Cemetery. The cemetery is maintained by Congregation Shaarie Torah.

Esther passed away on Dec. 17, 1942 and is also buried at Shaarie Torah Cemetery.

Whether Leon is actually the brother of Benjamin or a cousin has not been proven. I want to believe they were brothers. I have searched the census pages around Leons entries hoping to find Benjamin living close by but have had no luck.

The one thing discovered was times were tough for this family, Leon and Esther’s marriage was rocky and filled with heartache. Neither remarried, they tried a second time – there had to be a deep love and affection that survived. They are at rest buried next to each other at Shaarie Torah.

May their memories be a blessing

Posted in DNA, England, Genealogy, Greenblatt, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch

Connecting the Greenblatt Family

From the Social Security application for my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz, I learned that my 2x great grandmother was a woman named Ida Greenblatt (Grinblat) and her husband was Hyman Haimowitz. (from Sam’s death certificate Hyman was written Herman)

Ida was the mother of Samuel and his brother Marks Hyamovitch. The Hyamovitch/Hyams branch remained in London, England while Samuel immigrated to the states, settling in New York.

Next to nothing is known about Ida, her age and place of birth are estimates. Using Samuel’s birth year of 1875, going back 20 years, I have estimated Ida’s birth year about 1855, with a place of birth possibly Odessa, where on some records, Samuel had listed that as his place of birth, the family then moving into Romania where his brother Marks was born 1880 in Iasi.

I have been sitting on DNA matches to others with Greenblatt in their trees for quite some time. I am constantly reevaluating and comparing shared matches with 4 my known cousins off of the Hyamovitch (England) who have tested and known cousins here in the states in hopes of finding a pattern or connection back to Ida. The process has been time consuming and often required me to build the trees for some of these matches. The matches are mostly 4 – 6 generations, then into the 5 – 8 generations back. Almost impossible at times to connect.

Even so, I believe I may have discovered 1 brother of Ida Greenblatt who also immigrated to the United States with his family settling in Michigan.

Building my research:

This brother was a man named Pincus Greenblatt who married to Eva/Edith Broad.

I discovered Pincus and Eva by working off of a 4 -6 DNA match with 2 people to Abraham Greenblatt in their line, I had sent away for his marriage certificate to Fannie Schwartz to learn who his parents were. Abraham married at 27 years which made his birth year 1872, by going back 20 years, I estimated Pincus’s birth year about 1852, in line with Ida’s 1855 birth year.

Once I had the names of Pincus and Eva, I used Ancestry member trees to build their family tree. (all ages and names are from trees and may be incomplete and/or approx and not entirely accurate)

Pincus and Eva/Edith were the parents of Bayla/Bella, Mordecai, Breina/Rebecca b. 1869, Romania who married Israel Schwartz, Esther b. 1870, Romania who married Jacob Escoff, and Abraham b. 1872, Romania who married Fannie Schwartz.

Rebecca and Israel Schwartz were the parents of Max b. 1896 m Leonore Silverman, Harry b. 1892, Edward b. 1892 m Florence Seigel, Sarah b. 1895 m Israel Shemper, Charles b. 1898 m Frieda Chill & Beatrice LNU, (all born in Romania) and Bella b.1909, NYC d. 1903

Esther and Jacob Escoff were the parents of Adolf m Fannie Wilner, Sarah m Max Aronvici, Frank m Pearl, Rebecca/Rae m Benjamin Podolsky, and Isabelle m Jacob Goldhaber, Mollie b. 1898 m Max Smith, Zelda b. 1904 m Charles Tennen, (all born in Romania) and Edith b. 1907 Mich. m Leslie Meltzer and Ida b. 1909 Mich. m Samuel Levin

Abraham Greenblatt and Fannie were the parents of Bella b. 1909 m Edward Schultz, Pincus/Paul b. 1910, Lillian b. 1913 m Jack Blackoff and Annette b. 1922 m Jerome Kinoy (all children born in NYC)

I have (2) 4-6 DNA matches, all shared with my England cousins to Breina/Rebecca to Israel Schwartz and a 4 -6 match to Esther and Jacob Escoff (Ostrow) off of their daughter Rachel/Rae who married Benjamin Podolsky. There is also a 3 – 5 match off of son Abraham Grrenblatt and Fannie Schwartz

In order to understand a little clearer, posted below is a working copy of how I mapped out my notes. I used the individual DNA connected branches to created a tree. Originally I had an individual tree for Esther, Rebecca and Abraham, eventually putting them together to see how they all fit.

In most cases I have I expanded the trees to living descendants using obituary and member trees but have excluded names and information

My research is ongoing and evolving. Hopefully new information and distant cousin connection will either prove this working theory or help explain the family connection.

For now I am cautiously believing that Pincus Greenblatt born abt 1850 is the brother of my 2x great grandmother Ida Greenblatt.

Posted in Ancestry, DNA, Genealogy, Jewish History, Lifschitz, Lifshitz, Lipschitz, Lipshitz, Paley, Palley

Fannie Lifshitz (1896 – 1992) and Abraham Ordin (1890 – 1957)

It is time for me to go back and address the Lipshitz branch of the family. Most recently, through the blog, I connected with two distant cousins and while DNA has confirmed the connection, I am still unable to connect our dots. They both connect to me through Solomon and Sarah Maria Lifshitz. I was delighted to be gifted this wonderful wedding photo of the marriage of Fannie Lifshitz and Abraham Ordin.

Abraham Odin and Fannie Lifshitz ~ Courtesy Ordin Family

Fannie Lifshitz was the daughter of Solomon (Zalman Hillel) Lifshitz and Sarah Marie Kinoy. She was born on July 18, 1896, Gomel, Russia. On January 17, 1915, N.Y.C., Fannie married Abraham Ordin. He was the the son of Hersh Ordin and Minnie Rosenbloom (info from family search.org) Abraham was born abt. 1890 Gomel, (Belarus) Russia The photo above is the first photo I have for this family branch.

  • I need to make note of the spelling of the last name. While my immediate branch spelled it with a ‘p’ most all other branches spelled it with a ‘f’

My great grandfather was a man named Benjamin Lipshitz. He was born November 10, 1883, Slutsk, (Belarus) Russia. His date of immigration is still unknown however it was prior to November, 1913 in N.Y.C., when he married Kate Rosen born the 10 January, 1889, Sompolno, Poland. Both Benjamin and Kate were born hearing but both became deaf from childhood illnesses.

They had three daughters Myra (b. 1914) my grandmother, Esther (b.1916) and Mary (b.1918).

Prior to the beginning of my family research very little to no information was known about Benjamin’s family, parents, siblings. All the information/knowledge seemed to be lost.

By obtaining marriage and death records for Benjamin I learned that his parents were

David Lipshitz and Ida Paley. I am estimating their birth years 20 years prior to their first child, to be about 1847 – 1850. For Ida I have numerous first names on documents, Ida, Yetta, Edith, Gittle as well as Pallai/Palley for the last name. With this information, some DNA matches and purchasing marriage and death documents, along with using familysearch.org, I was able to confirm these 4 siblings with 1 still unconfirmed.

Benjamin’s siblings were

Fanny (b.1870), Molly (b.1872), Solomon (b.1873), Isaac (b.1880) and Samuel.

Fanny married Israel Lifshitz (same last name) and went on to have Estelle, Jacob, Samuel, Benjamin and Dorothy.

Molly married Hyman (Harry) Cohen and they went on to have two sons, Jacob and Joseph.

Solomon (Simon) married Anna Dinofsky and they had Moses (Moe), Rachel (Rae), Esther (Estelle), Stella Dora and Charles.

Isaac (Ike) married Rebecca Leff and they had two sons David and Naphtali

The last of the siblings was Samuel but I have no information at this time for him.

Also connected through DNA is the family of Fannie above. Her siblings were

Samuel (abt 1885) Elias (b.1887), Isaac Isidore (b.1890), Ida, Annie, Fannie (b.1896), Minnie (b. 1900) and Emaunel (b. 1905)

Samuel – I have no information

Elias married Maria (Manya) Golden they had Ruth Rachel, Murray (Moses), Jean, Anne Constance, Betty, Edith and Edward

Isaac Isidore married Bertha Deitch and they had daughter Frances and son Bernard.

Ida and Annie – I have no information on either of them

Minnie Michele married Julius Delan they had children Daniel, Hannah, Edith, and Ira Arthur

Emanuel married Eleanor Rosen and they had Martha, Howard and Susan

These two families connect, just how I have not been able to figure out. When my great grandfather Benjamin married Kate Rosen (an arranged marriage) he was living at 1268 Park Ave. N.Y.C. as noted on his marriage license. On the 1915 census living at that same address was Solomon and Sarah Marie with children Annie, Minnie, Mendel (Emanuel) and Isaac. Solomon and Sarah would remain at that address up until Solomon passed in 1935.

Also at that same address in 1910c and 1915c was Benjamin’s brother Isaac (Ike) wife Rebecca and their two sons David and Naphtali.

Solomon’s (Zalman Hillel) parents, as listed on his death certificate were David Lifshitz and Rachel Rifkin. Using the age of Solomon at his passing of 62 we can estimate his birth year as about 1873. Going back 20 years we can estimate his fathers date of birth as about 1853. Doing the same with my great grandfather and his siblings estimating his father David Lifshitz born between 1847 – 1850. The overlap of ages for children rules out David as having been married to Rachel Rifkin then Ida Paley (or vice versa). So we need to go back a generation if not more for our shared ancestor. With out more information for now I am stuck.

But connections with families means the possibilities of more information and answers so I have never been more excited to connect with the descendants of Fanny Lifshitz and Elias Lifshitz.

Posted in Bride, Chicago, DNA, England, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, London, New York, Romania, Srulowitz, Strulowitz

2020 ~ A Brief Year In Review

At the beginning of 2020, I started the year with renewed hope in finding two missing woman, both great grand Aunts on each my maternal and paternal side.

Still missing is the sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch.

Also still missing is the sister of my great grandmother Rebecca Haimowitz nee Srulowitz/Strulowitz.

I still have no concrete leads despite numerous DNA connections which have been of no help in discovering who they are. Below is a picture of Samuel Haimowitz and Rebecca Srulowitz.

Samuel and Rebecca (Srulowitz) Haimowitz

We know that Rebecca’s sister was called Minnie, she did marry and had 2 daughters, one who was named Molly, known as red headed Molly as not to be confused with her cousin named Molly. We also know that Rebecca had family in Chicago, Ill.

While very little to no progress made on my direct branch this year, quite a few wonderful discoveries and picture were shared with me by the families of Samuel Haimowitz’s brother, Marks Hyamovitch and his wife Polly (Pauline) Weiss.

I love the wedding photo’s

One of my favorite photos was of Polly Hymovitch. Here she is in London feeding the pigeons. Can’t you just hear Julie Andrews singing Feed The Birds from the Sound Of Music?

Also a favorite of this year was this family photo of Marks and Polly with their first four born, all boys. This is the earliest known photo of the family that I have seen so far (about 1910) The photo came from the Weiss Family Collection. From lt to rt: Samuel, Polly, Jack, Phillip, Hyam and Marks. The boys look awfully smart in their matching outfits. Marks and Polly went on to have 5 more children, Annie Joyce, Benjamin, Freda, Edith and Harry. All went on to adulthood with the exception of Benjamin who passed at 4 years old and Edith at 1.

I think by far the most interesting question that came up in my research this year was with the marriage of Jeanette Weiss and Emanuel Goldberg.

Emanuel and Jeanette

Had I actually found a connection linking the Weiss – Haimowitz – and Srulowitz families together through marriage? The families all came from Romania, with the brothers Sam and Marks marring there before immigrating. They most likely all came from close proximity in that time from Iasi (Yassy). Had they continued a family bond between the three? You can read about the connection in the post below.

https://wordpress.com/post/nwpaintedlady.wordpress.com/8762

For a quick recap – Emanuel and Jeanette lived in Chicago, Ill. They had a son Kalman Goldberg who married Arlene Srulowitz (Chicago, Ill.) You may recall I did say that my Rebecca Srulowitz’s family settled in Chicago. To go on, I have 3 DNA connections to the family of this Arlene Srulowitz, the daughter of Herman Srulowitz, son of Isadore Srulowitz and Esther Altberger. Nothing else has come to light but I am encouraged to continue with this thread.

I am not sure of the direction of research for 2021 but I am excited to see what develops.

Posted in Adoption, Ancestry, DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch

Remembering Marlene Haimowitz

Today marks the 14th year of the passing of Marlene Haimowitz ~ the woman who gave me life ~ a woman I had the privilege of meeting. For ‘Wordless Wednesday’ this past week I posted this photo of Marlene.

Marlene ~ 23 Jan 1934 Bronx, N.Y. – 6 Oct 2005 Kissimmee, Fl. 

Marlene3 copy

This lovely photo had been shared with me recently by her sister Rochelle, her only surviving sibling.

Taken on her wedding day shortly after my birth and placement for adoption through the then popular Jewish adoption agency – Louise Wise, Marlene went on to have six more children all of which I have been able to have contact with on some level.

It is very difficult to look back on a life, a person, a primal connected person you really never knew with any true understanding and clarity on their life.

I had the privilege of meeting Marlene, exchanging letters and gifts over a two year period before she past away. It is with those memories  I can connect with her.

But what of connecting, of digging and pushing and finding answer to the questions that drive the adopted person to discover their past ? The who am I and why? What of the connections that don’t connect?

In this explosion of the adoption issues, the opening of records, DNA, the hunts, the finds, the question really becomes what do you do with the finds, the good and the bad? How do you sort them out, put them into perspective, incorporate them into the now of your life?

And so this year as I reflect and remember Marlene, all the discoveries into my past, my heritage on both the maternal and paternal sides, family both close and distant I have met, the stories and photo’s shared, even the rejections ~  I say thank you with total acceptance for what was, what is and what will be.

Thank you to Marlene who faced the difficult task of having me when choices were limited, when shame replaced joy.

Thank you for giving me life.

 

May her memory be a blessing to all who knew and loved her

 

Posted in Casriel Haimowitz, DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, Jewish History, New York, Odessa, Romania

Mash Letters and Hot Dogs ~ A Haimowitz Connection

 

In my on going search for the sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch, some how I found myself combing newspapers.com for Haimowitz mentions. I had begun my morning going over all my DNA matches looking for a common thread and something must have triggered that plunge down the rabbit hole. It wasn’t long before I began spotting some interesting articles then cross checking on ancestry.

RabbitHoles

This was a case of infidelity by Mrs. Belle Julian Lippner, accused by her husband, Jordan Lippner, described as a self made pure food monarch of Westerchester Co., He was accusing her of having an affair with her ‘six foot caddy’.

2

Jordan was accusing his wife of being in the company of other men. But it was some of the terms that caught my interest and kept me reading in this 1929 Daily News article of Nov. 28th.

Jordan accused her of  being a “Pseudo-intellectual, a Bohemian, an advocate of free love. To high brow and “Freudian” in her conversations.”

Belle accused Jordon of having “amnesia when telling her about his life’s history” she went on to say “he was reading to many “hot dog’magazines”.

Justice Joseph Morschauser was not impressed with Belle’s testimony and denied her request for $100 weekly alimony and $500 in her attorney fees. Justice Morschauser reprimanded her on not stopping her lover from writing her “affectionate letters” and went on to say “a wife has no right to receive mash notes.”

Belle, now living with her mother, had been away at ‘summer camp’ and when she had returned home, she told her husband she was with child. It was then he accused her of the unfaithfulness. That is when she left him she said.

Added into evidence were three letters written to Belle by Sidney Haimowitz (b-1910). The 1st letter was dated 24 July 1929 from Island Camp, Craryville, NY; the 2nd from Lake George on 18th of August and a 3rd with no date. In letter number 2 Sidney was excited to be seeing her the following weekend. The letters to Belle seemed so simplistically sweet and I quote the last letter he had written from the article “all day Monday, after you had left, everything I saw and heard reminded me of you, and my heart missed a beat or two, and I thought the craziest things”

Reading the article I found myself routing for a love story between Belle and her caddy Sidney. Belle it seemed to me could be the poster girl for the Flapper generation and for that matter a poster girl for my hippie generation. Had anything really changed?

Getting back to the the ‘hot dog’ magazines that Belle accused her husband Jordon of reading. It’s context led me to believe she was referring to some racy men’s magazine of it’s time and I wasn’t let down. Below is an article that led me down an additional rabbit hole to some of the most interesting reading in some time.

Hot Dogs And Prohibition Smut: Jack Dinsmore’s The Regular Fellows Monthly (1922)

3

What happened to Jordon Lippner, wealthy pure food monarch, his wife Belle Julian Lippner and Sidney Haimowitz?  Perhaps a tale for another time but what connects this story is multi DNA connections for me to the family of Sidney Haimowitz back to his grandfather

Casriel (Charles) Haimowitz b. 1844 Romania d. 24 Feb 1917 N.Y.C.  and his wife Ida or Yetta Greenberg b. Apr 1845 Romania d. 1915 N.Y.C.

Casriel’s father was

Hyman Haimowitz and mother Ida Moskowitz both born about 1820 – country unknown

I have long suspected that Casriel holds a key to our family and our MRCA for many of my DNA connections, which has not been easy to prove.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, DNA, Familes, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Jewish History, London, New York, Romania

The 4th of July 2019

As I welcomed today, this 4th of July,  2019, it began as all others, the usual morning routine; I knew there would be no holiday picnic, no family close by to gather with. There would be late night tv mixed with the dread of bombs bursting in air over our evening sky and we would be up consoling our fur baby and keeping him calm. Then another thought began to surface.

This was the first 4th of July since finding my English ancestors, the first, knowing I had actual family who made their life there in England, the first time to think about the importance and impact of my ancestors choices on mine and my families lives. The first time I would be thinking of and looking at our separation and independence from Great Britain in a totally new light.

My great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz immigrated, arrived and settled in the United States of America sometime between 1900 and 1902 while his brother Marks Hyamovitch arrived in England in 1901 where he settled and established his family. Both of them immigrating from Romania.

 

Samuel and Marks

There are so many questions regarding these two brothers and their choices.  The most obvious for me is why had Samuel chosen America and why had Marks chosen England? Had they traveled from Romania together before Sam left for America? If so why had Marks remained? What had influenced their choices? Was it a financial or personal preference? What had been their relationship prior to their decisions? Both men were carpenters and perhaps they worked together at some point. Their age difference is about 5 years. Sam the oldest born about 1875 and Marks in 1880. It appears as with many families with great distances between them that over the years and generations information and contact between these two families was lost. All these questions and more remain now for those of us who have come after them.

Just last month a cousin, Arline, traveled with her husband from California to London to meet for the first time this branch of cousins. It has been about 70 years since a member of the English branch traveled here to New York. It had been through one lone photo taken at this meeting, that survived with the English branch, that connected us all together again. In just a couple of weeks, Arline, who I too have never met, will travel from her home to mine in Washington state and we will meet.

This 4th of July has taken on a very new and special meaning for me…the 13 colonies may have separated and declared their independence back in 1776 but I am declaring and my proclamation is no amount of time and distance or declaration by our forefathers can separate or divide me from my extended family. We are forever connected not only through DNA but the bond of humanity.

one-family

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Jewish History, Lifschitz, Lipschitz, Romania, Rosen

And The Adventure Continues

2018 has been an amazing year for our family history with quite a few walls crumbling down. Cousin connections were made and others were strengthened.

The highlight for this year has been two mysteries solved within the Lipschitz and Haimowitz families.

The story of Benjamin Lipschitz, my great grandfather on my birthmother Marlene’s maternal side, was solved with a 3rd cousin DNA match to Jane.

I had been haunted for quite some time regarding Benjamin and his wife Kate Rosen. Both of them deaf from a childhood illness, they were joined together through an arranged marriage. I just knew there had to be more to their story and family than just my grandmother Myra, her sisters Esther and Mary and their descendants. There was!

On my Haimowitz side I had knowledge that some family had immigrated to England from Romania. Who this ‘family’ was, was a complete unknown. Siblings, Uncles, Aunts, cousins..we had no clue. Due solely to the writing of this blog and a post on this mystery family connection, I was contacted by a woman in England which led to a conclusive DNA connection that we discovered this English branch. Marks Hyamovitch was the brother of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz, who set down roots in England.

Both these discoveries and connections to cousins has been a highlight in my family research journey this year. And while these mystery were solved so many yet remain.

One such mystery – who is the mystery sister on the left of Samuel and their niece, Freda Hyams (Hyamovitch) daughter of Marks?

SamuelHaimowitz6 copy

Another highlight for me this year came very recently in way of a photo share from my birthmother’s sister Rochelle and her daughter Lisa. I was sent this photo of Marlene Haimowitz just a month or so after she gave birth to me. Pregnant with me through all of her 18th year she gave birth to be 16 days after turning 19 on February 8th, 1953.

Marlene Haimowitz

Marlene3 copy

I started 2018 with a purchase and post on a beautiful piece of jewelry and I think most appropriate for ending this year.

The Chai, pronounced ‘hay’, is a letter in the alphabet with its numerical number 18. This is a spiritual number in Judaism and it most certainly fulfilled its destiny this year in bringing much life to our family.

Chai

I would like to thank all of my family and friends who have followed along this year, commented and contributed to our families rich heritage. To all the cousin connections, both old and new, those connections with their strings still undone, I am excited for the new year and new discoveries in store.

A happy healthy coming year

as the adventure continues

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, DNA, Galati, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, Jewish History, Odessa, Romania, Strulowitz, Weiss

Marks Hyamovitch Family

In the story of The Three Little Pigs, the 3rd and final house was made of brick ~ The wolf huffed and he puffed but couldn’t blow the house down. With genealogy we often refer to a brick wall in our research, that wall stops us in our tracks and can keep us from moving backwards in our research. But I huffed and puffed and with the help of this blog and a little help from a fellow blogger, one of my brick walls did crumble.

What I knew was that my great grandfather had family living in England. Who they were and what the connection was I had no idea. I also knew that he had a sister but we had no knowledge of her name or who she married. We knew only that she had immigrated from Romania and was here in New York with my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz. The extent of our information on her was one photo and only a partial picture of her at that. So when I was contacted by a descendant of our English branch of the family I was overjoyed not only to learn of them but to have a wonderful photo shared with us.  Below and on the left is the “mystery sister” next to her brother Samuel and Freda, their niece, daughter of Marks Hyamovitch, brother of Samuel, visiting from England. They were meeting in New York for the first time. This photo was sent to me by a cousin stating ‘we think this is your great grandfather with the daughter of his brother Marks Hyamovitch.

SamuelHaimowitz6 copy

Later identification was confirmed by my family members as well as DNA to a new English cousin. That indeed was my great grandfather with his sister along with Freda Hyamovitch.

Marks Hyamovitch was born in 1880, Iasi, Romania. He was five years younger than his brother Samuel who was born in Odessa, Russian Empire/Ukraine in 1875. Their parents were Hyman Haimowitz and Ida/Yetta Greenblatt.  Tracking their movement from documents, we know that in 1875 the family was at home in Odessa, along the Black Sea where Sam was born. Some time prior to or by Samuel becoming 5 years old they made the move to Iasi, Romania, the hub of Jewish life where Marks was born in 1880. From this time frame up until 1898 I have no family information. Samuel married Rebecca Strulowitz, daughter of Samuel Strulowitz and Minnie Cohen by 1898 (in Romania)  At some point Samuel had left Iasi and moved south to the town of Galati, Romania. That is where his first son Hyman/Herman was born in 1898.

By 1900 at the age of 20, Marks had made his way to England, where he settled. Samuel had not arrived in New York until sometime between 1901 and prior to the 1905 which left the possibility of him traveling to England as well, before departing for New York. I have been unable to find any information on Samuel’s immigration or been able to track a route for him. So many question are still left unanswered. Had he possibly gone with his brother to England and then over to America?

Both Samuel and Marks named son’s after their father so I suspect Hyman had passed away by the time 1st grandson Hyman was born in 1898. This raised the question for me, where was their mother Ida/Yetta? Had she remained in Romania?

I am not concerned about the different spelling of Marks last name as Hyamovitch and not Haimowitz  like Samuels. I attribute it to location, perhaps a spelling error or assimilation to region if there is such a thing. I tend to think Hyamovitch may have been the more accurate spelling of their last name.

Shared with me by the family of Marks is the document below.

Aliens Order 1920, Certificate of Regerstration

17 April 1945

MarksImm.papers2

What a wonderful document. Even though his profession of carpenter is crossed off (why?) Marks and his brother Samuel both were carpenters their entire adult life.

His wife was named Polly Weiss born in 1882, Romania. She was the daughter of Sam Weiss and her mother’s maiden name was Shwaltz (info from family) and shown on document. I am unable to make out her first name.

8

9

From the descendants of Marks and Polly I learned they had eight children spanning a period of 20 years all born in London. This generation of children went on to change their last name to Hyams.

First born was Samuel b. 5 May, 1903 followed by Hyman b. 17 May, 1904,  Philip/Pinny 5 June, 1906 Jack b. 28 June, 1908 Annie b. 1912 Benjamin b. 20 March, 1912, Freda b. 1919 and Harry b. 26 March, 1923

Marks Hyamovitch died in December 16, 1962 in the Tooting Bee Hospital, Wandsworth, London, England. He was 81 years old. Cause of death was listed as 1a. bronchopneumonia 1b.generalized arteriosclerosis 2. senility

MarksDeathCert.2

He is buried at the Rainham Jewish Cemetery, Rainham Borough of Havering, Greater London, England

Marksgrave2

A big Thank you to the members of the Facebook page ‘Tracing The Tribe’ for the translation of the stone. Their willingness to help, explain, suggest, interpret is always so appreciated. Member Robin Meltzer wrote;

Hi Sharon – this is the complete translation: “[abbreviation] Here lies buried/ Mr. Mendel son of Mr. Pinchas/ died 20 Kislev 5723 [abbreviation] by the small count/ [abbreviation] May her soul be bound in the bond of life.” The Hebrew word at the very bottom of the stone is “Shalom,” in this context, “peace.” His father’s name was Pinchas.

So two things jumped out at me, the first being that Marks name was actually Mendel which I did not know and the second thing was his fathers name was written as Pinchas. This is in conflict with what was written on the stone of his brother Samuel seen below.

So I posed this question or statement

“What is interesting to me is that on the headstones of two brother’s one said ‘son of Haim’ and this said ‘son of Pinchas’. Both brothers named son’s Hyman and Pinchas. I suppose the engravings of names on the stones is reflective of who is giving the information and not always the exact name. One brother was in the states the other in England. Again thank you all for the help.” 

Sharon – it is possible that the father had two given names, “Chaim Pinchas” or “Pinchas Chaim.” On the headstones you mentioned, is there a time period where one name is used and not the other, or do they switch back and forth? If there are religious marriage records for his children, that might help clear this up

I posted the photo of Samuels headstone

samhaimowitzgrave

And the translation of Samuel’s headstone by Robin

“[abbr] Here lies buried/ Yehoshua son of Mr. Chaim/ died 18 Nisan 5714/ [abbr] May his soul be bound in the bond of life.” “Haimowitz” is the patronymic of “Chaim.” But people changed surnames, full siblings adopted different surnames, so proving that could be difficult. If “Pinchas” was in use earlier than “Chaim,” another possibility is that the father had “Chaim” added to “Pinchas” as an amuletic name later in life due to illness. But it is actually rare that even when there is good documentation of an additional name, that the amuletic name is included in the headstone inscription. Different families have very different customs for this.

I do not have an explanation for the difference in their fathers known first name. I still am partial to Samuel and Marks having sons named Pinchas/Pincus = Paul to us and Philip/Pinny = Pinchas/Pincus and son’s named Hyman as an explanation for tying the first name together.

Marks Hyamovitch 

7 copy

Marks and Polly with Annie and Freda 

MarksPolly2girls2 copy               Photo’s  courtesy of the Hyamovitch Family

Polly Hyamovitch nee Weiss

Polly .jpg

Polly passed a year after her husband Marks on March 13, 1963 at Middlesex Hospital, St Marylebone, Middlesex, England. She was 82 years old.

flowers21

 

 

Posted in DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, Jewish History, Pittsburgh

Puzzle Pieces of the Haimowitz Family are Falling Into Place

In my last post I shared a recent discovery and posed a comparison question for a photo I had recently received. I asked my family and readers for their opinion: could these two men be the same person?

SamuelHaimowitz5

 

Before I go further with this post I wanted to take just a moment to respond to the most recent tragedy that has struck, devastated, shook a city, a people, a country, to it’s core. Looking into the eyes of my great grandfather Samuel in the picture above, I can hear him whispering ‘we must never forget; find your place, your voice and tell our story’ In a essay my (adopting) mother wrote in the late 40’s, her timeless words ring as true then as it does today

“even though conditions in the world look dark now and many of us are despairing, we must remember that our fathers survived all trials and tribulations ever since the beginning of time, thus we must never give up hope. What out ancestors were able to do again and again in the past under all conceivable circumstances and in all parts of the world we may yet do again in the future” Grace Judith Tanner

Today I remember the 11 beautiful souls who lost their lives to hate and anti semitism in Pittsburg on October 27th, 2018. I  will always remember them, their families and the city of Pittsburg.

Today I will tell our story which is their story ~ we are connected and connecting, remembering and reminding ~ we are ~ we matter ~ you are ~ you matter ~ we all have a place and story to share ~ you are valuable and will never be forgotten.

candleburning

 

In the photo of the two men above I had asked – could they be the same man? The answer is yes, they are, which led to a most welcomed and earth shaking crumbling of a brick wall in my family research. A cousin named Arline had shared with me that some of the family of Samuel Haimowitz had remained in England and never immigrated from their home country of Romania to the U.S.. That was the extent of my information. Nothing else. A series of events led to Karen (3rd c in England) reaching out to me, the domino’s fell connecting me to her and now 3 more family members

One of those members, a cousin named Joan ( 2c 1r)  had done her DNA with MyHeritage. I had tested with Ancestry, so after some thought on how we could compare our DNA, I uploaded mine from Ancestry to MyHeritage, almost positive we would have a match. In the meantime Karen, Joan and myself began to share information and photo’s trying to get a better picture and an idea of what exactly was going on. Entering the conversation another cousin named Stephen added to the information and then Fred.

All of these 3 shared a man named Marks Hyamovitch who we believed was/is the brother of my Samuel Haimowitz. While the spelling of the last name is not the same it did not deter me from suspecting the match. Below is the picture Karen had shared with me.  She suspected that the man in the middle could be my grandfather Samuel. The young woman on the right was Freda Hyamovitch/Hyams daughter of Marks Hyamovitch taken while she was in America visiting with her father s brother. The older woman was unknown. That is how I came to comparing the two photo’s we suspected were the same man. I have since learned that a branch from one of Marks children did immigrate to the U.S.. and since learning of this I have been contacted by yet another cousin named Fred joined the conversation.

SamuelHaimowitz6 copyPhoto Courtesy of the Hyamovitch Family

 

I shared the photo with my cousin Arline and my Aunt Rochelle. They both confirmed  that they had no doubt this was their grandfather Samuel Haimowitz, my great grandfather. In addition Arline had no doubt that the older woman was Samuel’s sister who’s identity is still unknown.

The DNA results are in and My Heritage has confirmed that I am a 1st cousin 2x removed to Joan over in England.

 

 

Marks Hyamovitch

b. 1880 Iasi, Romania

d. Dec 1962 Wandsworth, London, England

Marks1.jpg
Photo Courtesy of the Hyamovitch Family

 

In my next post I will begin to share the story of Marks and his wife Polly Weiss from the information that has been shared with me. ©