Posted in Casriel Haimowitz, DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, Jewish History, New York, Odessa, Romania

Mash Letters and Hot Dogs ~ A Haimowitz Connection

 

In my on going search for the sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch, some how I found myself combing newspapers.com for Haimowitz mentions. I had begun my morning going over all my DNA matches looking for a common thread and something must have triggered that plunge down the rabbit hole. It wasn’t long before I began spotting some interesting articles then cross checking on ancestry.

RabbitHoles

This was a case of infidelity by Mrs. Belle Julian Lippner, accused by her husband, Jordan Lippner, described as a self made pure food monarch of Westerchester Co., He was accusing her of having an affair with her ‘six foot caddy’.

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Jordan was accusing his wife of being in the company of other men. But it was some of the terms that caught my interest and kept me reading in this 1929 Daily News article of Nov. 28th.

Jordan accused her of  being a “Pseudo-intellectual, a Bohemian, an advocate of free love. To high brow and “Freudian” in her conversations.”

Belle accused Jordon of having “amnesia when telling her about his life’s history” she went on to say “he was reading to many “hot dog’magazines”.

Justice Joseph Morschauser was not impressed with Belle’s testimony and denied her request for $100 weekly alimony and $500 in her attorney fees. Justice Morschauser reprimanded her on not stopping her lover from writing her “affectionate letters” and went on to say “a wife has no right to receive mash notes.”

Belle, now living with her mother, had been away at ‘summer camp’ and when she had returned home, she told her husband she was with child. It was then he accused her of the unfaithfulness. That is when she left him she said.

Added into evidence were three letters written to Belle by Sidney Haimowitz (b-1910). The 1st letter was dated 24 July 1929 from Island Camp, Craryville, NY; the 2nd from Lake George on 18th of August and a 3rd with no date. In letter number 2 Sidney was excited to be seeing her the following weekend. The letters to Belle seemed so simplistically sweet and I quote the last letter he had written from the article “all day Monday, after you had left, everything I saw and heard reminded me of you, and my heart missed a beat or two, and I thought the craziest things”

Reading the article I found myself routing for a love story between Belle and her caddy Sidney. Belle it seemed to me could be the poster girl for the Flapper generation and for that matter a poster girl for my hippie generation. Had anything really changed?

Getting back to the the ‘hot dog’ magazines that Belle accused her husband Jordon of reading. It’s context led me to believe she was referring to some racy men’s magazine of it’s time and I wasn’t let down. Below is an article that led me down an additional rabbit hole to some of the most interesting reading in some time.

Hot Dogs And Prohibition Smut: Jack Dinsmore’s The Regular Fellows Monthly (1922)

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What happened to Jordon Lippner, wealthy pure food monarch, his wife Belle Julian Lippner and Sidney Haimowitz?  Perhaps a tale for another time but what connects this story is multi DNA connections for me to the family of Sidney Haimowitz back to his grandfather

Casriel (Charles) Haimowitz b. 1844 Romania d. 24 Feb 1917 N.Y.C.  and his wife Ida or Yetta Greenberg b. Apr 1845 Romania d. 1915 N.Y.C.

Casriel’s father was

Hyman Haimowitz and mother Ida Moskowitz both born about 1820 – country unknown

I have long suspected that Casriel holds a key to our family and our MRCA for many of my DNA connections, which has not been easy to prove.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, DNA, Familes, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Jewish History, London, New York, Romania

The 4th of July 2019

As I welcomed today, this 4th of July,  2019, it began as all others, the usual morning routine; I knew there would be no holiday picnic, no family close by to gather with. There would be late night tv mixed with the dread of bombs bursting in air over our evening sky and we would be up consoling our fur baby and keeping him calm. Then another thought began to surface.

This was the first 4th of July since finding my English ancestors, the first, knowing I had actual family who made their life there in England, the first time to think about the importance and impact of my ancestors choices on mine and my families lives. The first time I would be thinking of and looking at our separation and independence from Great Britain in a totally new light.

My great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz immigrated, arrived and settled in the United States of America sometime between 1900 and 1902 while his brother Marks Hyamovitch arrived in England in 1901 where he settled and established his family. Both of them immigrating from Romania.

 

Samuel and Marks

There are so many questions regarding these two brothers and their choices.  The most obvious for me is why had Samuel chosen America and why had Marks chosen England? Had they traveled from Romania together before Sam left for America? If so why had Marks remained? What had influenced their choices? Was it a financial or personal preference? What had been their relationship prior to their decisions? Both men were carpenters and perhaps they worked together at some point. Their age difference is about 5 years. Sam the oldest born about 1875 and Marks in 1880. It appears as with many families with great distances between them that over the years and generations information and contact between these two families was lost. All these questions and more remain now for those of us who have come after them.

Just last month a cousin, Arline, traveled with her husband from California to London to meet for the first time this branch of cousins. It has been about 70 years since a member of the English branch traveled here to New York. It had been through one lone photo taken at this meeting, that survived with the English branch, that connected us all together again. In just a couple of weeks, Arline, who I too have never met, will travel from her home to mine in Washington state and we will meet.

This 4th of July has taken on a very new and special meaning for me…the 13 colonies may have separated and declared their independence back in 1776 but I am declaring and my proclamation is no amount of time and distance or declaration by our forefathers can separate or divide me from my extended family. We are forever connected not only through DNA but the bond of humanity.

one-family

 

 

Posted in Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, Katanka, London, New York, Odessa, Romania, Weiss

~ Haimowitz ~ Hyamovitch ~ Hyams ~

Do you know me? 

MysteryWoman1

In an effort to keep my search for our missing mystery sister alive, I am again featuring her this month. The photo was taken sometime between 1949 and 1951 in the Bronx, N.Y. when Freda Katanka nee Hyams, made a trip to the states to meet her Aunt and Uncle.

This is the only known photo circulating in our family for her. She is the sister of my great grandfather

Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch

The differences in the last names is also a mystery. I suspect that Marks kept the last name most closest to the original spelling and Samuel perhaps Americanized the last name. It’s just a guess. Many of Marks children would go on to change their name to Hyams.

Their parents were known as Hyman Haimowitz and Ida Greenblatt (also seen as Yetta or Gitel). The spelling of Hyman Haimowitz came solely from the records for son Samuel.

Sam appears at this point to be the oldest, born about 1975 in Odesa, Russian Empire/Ukraine. From there the family crossed into Romania, made there way up to Iasi, where and when Marks was born in 1880. Where their sister fits in age wise we do not know. If there were other siblings we do not know that either. Their immigration out of Romania also remains a mystery.

Marks and his wife Polly Weiss settled in London, England. They were the parents of 9 children; Samuel, Hyman, Phillip, Jack, Annie Joyce, Benjamin, Freda, Edith, and Harry.

Marks Hyamovitch

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Samuel married Rebecca Srulowitz/Strulowitz and settled in New York, eventually in the Bronx. They would have 5 children Hyman, Pincus/Paul, Freda, Isidore, and Molly. 

Samuel Haimowitz

samuelhaimowitz

 

Posted in Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Jewish History, London, Romania

Our Missing Haimowitz Sister Update

On March 1st, under the title of The Search Continues For Our Missing Haimowitz SisterI had outlined my continued effort to try and discover who the sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch was. This brick wall in our family stories continues to haunt me. Who are you lady with the glasses along with Samuel your brother and niece Freda, daughter of your brother Marks?

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Marks Hyamovitch

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In the post on March 1st, I had written that I had sent away for the marriage certificate of Nathan Schoenfeld and Celia Haimovitch; 10 June 1908. I received the record yesterday, again a disappointment. She was not our missing sister.

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My thinking for sending for the marriage or death records of women with the maiden last name of Haimowitz, Hyamovitch and or any similar variations, is to match her with the parent’s names of Hyman Haimowitz and Ida Greenblatt. As you can see with this record,  Celia’s parent’s names were Joseph and Dollie Rubenstein.

My hypothesis is the assumption that once she immigrated from Romania she married in the states. This, of course, can be flawed. She may have married in Romania, she may have even made a stopover in England, where Marks and his family settled, met and married over there and then continued to the states. Family history does indicate that she lived and was married in the N.Y. area though.

The search continues….

 

 

 

©2019, copyright, Sharon Haimowitz-Civitano. All rights reserved.

 

Posted in Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch

Haimowitz Picture Compare: Opinions Needed

Continuing with my search for our missing mystery Haimowitz sister, I am asking for some help, opinions please, in trying to identify two photos. Certainly not scientific, but could move us forward with our mystery. Shared with me by my cousin Karen (London Hyamovitch branch) in response to my last posting, are these two photos of an unidentified woman.

1: Do you think this could be the same woman?

2: Could the woman in the younger photo be our missing mystery Haimowitz sister?

3: In this group, the older woman is Polly Hyamovitch, wife of Marks Hyamovitch. Could this photo of the younger woman be Polly?

 

Your thoughts are much appreciated

thank-you2

 

 

Posted in Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, Jewish History, London, Odessa, Romania

The Search Continues For Our Missing Haimowitz Sister

SamuelHaimowitz6 copy

Still searching for our missing Haimowitz/Hyamovitch sister. That’s her on the left, the older woman with the glasses. In the middle is her brother Samuel Haimowitz with their niece, Freda Hyamovitch/Hyams.

Samuel’s brother was named Marks, father of Freda.

With March on our heals and the year in full swing, I wanted to keep a family mystery and search for a missing sister in the forefront. Last year with the help of this blog and this picture, we were able to connect two branches of a family, long lost and now connected, that stretched across the Atlantic from London to New York.

The London branch spelled their last name as Hyamovitch/Hyams, while the American branch used Haimowitz.

The parents of our mystery sister were Hyman Haimowitz/Hyamovitch and Ida Greenblatt.

Still lost to us all is the name of Samuel and Marks sister. The family originated in Odessa then moved into Romania and made their way up into Iasi. From there Marks (born 1880) immigrated into England around 1901 and at about the same time Samuel (born 1875) immigrated across the ocean with his wife Rebecca and two boys, Hyman and Pincus.

A distant DNA match sparked my interest. Leaving no stone unturned, I have sent away for the marriage license of Celia ‘Tillie’ Haimowitz (born 1890), on the license it is spelled Hiamovitch, to a man named Nathan Schoenfeld. Both Nathan and Celia were from Romania. The birth date for Celia seems to fit.

I have already sent away and received documents for the following couples, but have determined the woman not to be our missing sister.  Emma Haimowitz married to Martin SugoffLugoff, Bessie Haimwoitz married to Jacob Sasslovsky, Ida Haimowitz married to Harry Weisberg, Sarah Haimowitz married to Samuel Blum, Rachel Haimowitz married to Marcus Steinberg and Jennie Haimowitz married to William Babit.

The search continues.