Posted in Ancestry, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Romania, Wordless Wednesday

2 Missing Sisters ~ Haimowitz and Strulowitz/Srulowitz

I have welcomed the new year with days of thought on what direction I should go with our family research and am still undecided. The two brick walls however remain standing, one for the missing Haimowitz sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch. The other brick wall is for the missing sister of Samuel’s wife Rebecca Strulowitz/Srulowitz. Both of these woman will remain foremost in my research this year.

Recapping my efforts for missing Haimowitz, I have put a considerable amount of time into finding, actually more like eliminating woman that are not her. I have been looking for Haimowitz woman in a 20 year radius of the two brothers birth years of 1875 and 1880, with a birth between 1870 to 1890. Knowing she did immigrate here from Romania, I am assuming she married here in the states ( NY ) but that could very well not be the case. While her brother Samuel immigrated here, her other brother Marks immigrated to England where he remained along with his branch of the family.  She could very well have gone to England first, married and then immigrated here. It is a long shot in the ‘no stone left unturned’ to investigate. We know from Samuels SS application his parents names were listed as Hyman Haimowitz and Ida Greenblatt. On his death certificate his parents were listed as Herman and Ida. On his headstone his father was written Haim. I am looking for anything that fits into these parameters.

Researched and eliminated this year were

Emma Haimowitz b. 1872 to Harry Haimowitz and Hannah Szumuscoff, Romania married Martin Lugoff, Jan. 1909

Bessy Haimowitz b. 1886 to Louis Haimowitz and Betsy Outler, Russia, married Jacob Sasslovsky, Oct 1908

Ida Haimowitz b. 1882 to Louis Haimowitz and Celia Gold, married Harry Weisberg, March 1902

Sarah Haimowitz b. 1881 to Solomon Haimowitz and Annie Brad, Russia, married Samuel Blum, Dec 1901

Clara Haimowitz b. 1893 to Hersh Haimowitz and Basha Krasner, married Dave Goluskin, June 1916

Ella Haimwitz b. 1883 to Leon Haimowitz and Sophia Moses, married Morris Bloomfield, Jan 1904

Clara Haimowitz married to David Frank, Jan 1903 – I received a no record found when I ordered the marriage certificate.

Eva Haimowitz b.1886 to Solomon Haimowitz and Adel Schwartz, married Hyman Schechter, May 1906

 Jennie Haimowitz b. 1883 to Charles Haimowitz and Yetta Greenberg, married William Babit, Dec 1907

Currently I am working on a Bessie Haimowitz b. 1892 married a Meyer Gropper on 18 June 1910. Checking on familysearch.com I found a marriage record that listed her parents names as Chaim Haimowitz and her mother as Yettie.

As I continue with this process it feels like a needle in haystack but needles have been found. I have two 3/4 cousin DNA matches with Greenblatt but unfortunately neither has responded to a number of requests to correspond – always disappointing.

I do have another lead I am following through with a family member in hopes she can be in touch with a granddaughter of Samuel still living who may remember this great aunt.

I am confident the answer is out there.

In my next post I will update on my progress with the missing Strulowitz sister

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, London, New York, Romania

Our Missing Unknown Haimowitz Sister

I know one day I will be posting “I found her” but not today. My search continues for the missing sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch – (our London Branch)

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Unknown sister, Samuel and Freda (daughter of Marks) Bronx (abt. 1950)

This mystery, ‘The mystery of the unknown Haimowitz Sister’ haunts my dreams and wakes me at all hours of the night with search idea’s, whispers of what I may have missed and what I should recheck.

Todays hunt led me to a woman named Ethel Rosenthal. Using familysearch.com, I put into a general search the last name of Haimowitz, an estimate for a birth date based on her brothers ages, along with the known parents last names. Using both mother (Greenblatt) and father (Haimowitz) yielded nothing, a repeat search with simply the father’s last name Haimowitz, about 200 matches came up. From there I began looking for a woman, with a father last name of Haimowitz- first name Hyman.

The idea is; on familysearch, they have a very easy way to view family before looking at the record. In other words I am always looking for a woman who’s records list a father’s name of Hyman Haimowitz and a mother Ida or Edith Greenblatt, any combination or creative spelling of the names. Records are always being added and changes made so I revisit often.

On page 3, I spotted Ethel Rosenthal. Her father was listed as Hiam Hamowitz, mother unknown. Ethel had passed in 1949 at 64, which gave me a birth year of 1885 . This was in my search parameters of 1880 – 1890. Her death was located in Cincinnati, Ohio and while I was looking for a NY death, nothing was out of the question. Checking the record there was a death certificate I was able to view.

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Could this be our missing sister? I was hopeful, I always am.

Back to ancestry.com I checked the census records and found her married to a Morris Rosenthal with a family of children ages 14 – 0 in the 1920c along with a hint that led me to a marriage certificate for a daughter, Mollie married – Nathan Stein; notice the informant on the death certificate. Another hint led me to an obituary listing in newspapers.com 

4.jpg                American Israelite (Cincinnati, Ohio) . 22 Sept 1949, Thu . Page p9

The anticipation of learning if this was our missing sister was answered, it was not or was it still in question?  There was no mention of Samuel or Marks. Of course the next question could be did ‘they’ have 3 more unknown siblings in this family? A brother Joseph, sister Sara and a Mrs. Ben Richman. Were Samuel and Marks unknown to this branch? A little too far out there to look into. I am feeling confident this is not the sister.

There have been many more hopeful searches in the quest to find our missing sister. Each one has been one of elimination so far which only brings me closer to her.

The hunt continues, hope is alive, the possibilities are endless.

Posted in Adoption, Ancestry, DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch

Remembering Marlene Haimowitz

Today marks the 14th year of the passing of Marlene Haimowitz ~ the woman who gave me life ~ a woman I had the privilege of meeting. For ‘Wordless Wednesday’ this past week I posted this photo of Marlene.

Marlene ~ 23 Jan 1934 Bronx, N.Y. – 6 Oct 2005 Kissimmee, Fl. 

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This lovely photo had been shared with me recently by her sister Rochelle, her only surviving sibling.

Taken on her wedding day shortly after my birth and placement for adoption through the then popular Jewish adoption agency – Louise Wise, Marlene went on to have six more children all of which I have been able to have contact with on some level.

It is very difficult to look back on a life, a person, a primal connected person you really never knew with any true understanding and clarity on their life.

I had the privilege of meeting Marlene, exchanging letters and gifts over a two year period before she past away. It is with those memories  I can connect with her.

But what of connecting, of digging and pushing and finding answer to the questions that drive the adopted person to discover their past ? The who am I and why? What of the connections that don’t connect?

In this explosion of the adoption issues, the opening of records, DNA, the hunts, the finds, the question really becomes what do you do with the finds, the good and the bad? How do you sort them out, put them into perspective, incorporate them into the now of your life?

And so this year as I reflect and remember Marlene, all the discoveries into my past, my heritage on both the maternal and paternal sides, family both close and distant I have met, the stories and photo’s shared, even the rejections ~  I say thank you with total acceptance for what was, what is and what will be.

Thank you to Marlene who faced the difficult task of having me when choices were limited, when shame replaced joy.

Thank you for giving me life.

 

May her memory be a blessing to all who knew and loved her

 

Posted in Casriel Haimowitz, DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, Jewish History, New York, Odessa, Romania

Mash Letters and Hot Dogs ~ A Haimowitz Connection

 

In my on going search for the sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch, some how I found myself combing newspapers.com for Haimowitz mentions. I had begun my morning going over all my DNA matches looking for a common thread and something must have triggered that plunge down the rabbit hole. It wasn’t long before I began spotting some interesting articles then cross checking on ancestry.

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This was a case of infidelity by Mrs. Belle Julian Lippner, accused by her husband, Jordan Lippner, described as a self made pure food monarch of Westerchester Co., He was accusing her of having an affair with her ‘six foot caddy’.

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Jordan was accusing his wife of being in the company of other men. But it was some of the terms that caught my interest and kept me reading in this 1929 Daily News article of Nov. 28th.

Jordan accused her of  being a “Pseudo-intellectual, a Bohemian, an advocate of free love. To high brow and “Freudian” in her conversations.”

Belle accused Jordon of having “amnesia when telling her about his life’s history” she went on to say “he was reading to many “hot dog’magazines”.

Justice Joseph Morschauser was not impressed with Belle’s testimony and denied her request for $100 weekly alimony and $500 in her attorney fees. Justice Morschauser reprimanded her on not stopping her lover from writing her “affectionate letters” and went on to say “a wife has no right to receive mash notes.”

Belle, now living with her mother, had been away at ‘summer camp’ and when she had returned home, she told her husband she was with child. It was then he accused her of the unfaithfulness. That is when she left him she said.

Added into evidence were three letters written to Belle by Sidney Haimowitz (b-1910). The 1st letter was dated 24 July 1929 from Island Camp, Craryville, NY; the 2nd from Lake George on 18th of August and a 3rd with no date. In letter number 2 Sidney was excited to be seeing her the following weekend. The letters to Belle seemed so simplistically sweet and I quote the last letter he had written from the article “all day Monday, after you had left, everything I saw and heard reminded me of you, and my heart missed a beat or two, and I thought the craziest things”

Reading the article I found myself routing for a love story between Belle and her caddy Sidney. Belle it seemed to me could be the poster girl for the Flapper generation and for that matter a poster girl for my hippie generation. Had anything really changed?

Getting back to the the ‘hot dog’ magazines that Belle accused her husband Jordon of reading. It’s context led me to believe she was referring to some racy men’s magazine of it’s time and I wasn’t let down. Below is an article that led me down an additional rabbit hole to some of the most interesting reading in some time.

Hot Dogs And Prohibition Smut: Jack Dinsmore’s The Regular Fellows Monthly (1922)

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What happened to Jordon Lippner, wealthy pure food monarch, his wife Belle Julian Lippner and Sidney Haimowitz?  Perhaps a tale for another time but what connects this story is multi DNA connections for me to the family of Sidney Haimowitz back to his grandfather

Casriel (Charles) Haimowitz b. 1844 Romania d. 24 Feb 1917 N.Y.C.  and his wife Ida or Yetta Greenberg b. Apr 1845 Romania d. 1915 N.Y.C.

Casriel’s father was

Hyman Haimowitz and mother Ida Moskowitz both born about 1820 – country unknown

I have long suspected that Casriel holds a key to our family and our MRCA for many of my DNA connections, which has not been easy to prove.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, DNA, Familes, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Jewish History, London, New York, Romania

The 4th of July 2019

As I welcomed today, this 4th of July,  2019, it began as all others, the usual morning routine; I knew there would be no holiday picnic, no family close by to gather with. There would be late night tv mixed with the dread of bombs bursting in air over our evening sky and we would be up consoling our fur baby and keeping him calm. Then another thought began to surface.

This was the first 4th of July since finding my English ancestors, the first, knowing I had actual family who made their life there in England, the first time to think about the importance and impact of my ancestors choices on mine and my families lives. The first time I would be thinking of and looking at our separation and independence from Great Britain in a totally new light.

My great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz immigrated, arrived and settled in the United States of America sometime between 1900 and 1902 while his brother Marks Hyamovitch arrived in England in 1901 where he settled and established his family. Both of them immigrating from Romania.

 

Samuel and Marks

There are so many questions regarding these two brothers and their choices.  The most obvious for me is why had Samuel chosen America and why had Marks chosen England? Had they traveled from Romania together before Sam left for America? If so why had Marks remained? What had influenced their choices? Was it a financial or personal preference? What had been their relationship prior to their decisions? Both men were carpenters and perhaps they worked together at some point. Their age difference is about 5 years. Sam the oldest born about 1875 and Marks in 1880. It appears as with many families with great distances between them that over the years and generations information and contact between these two families was lost. All these questions and more remain now for those of us who have come after them.

Just last month a cousin, Arline, traveled with her husband from California to London to meet for the first time this branch of cousins. It has been about 70 years since a member of the English branch traveled here to New York. It had been through one lone photo taken at this meeting, that survived with the English branch, that connected us all together again. In just a couple of weeks, Arline, who I too have never met, will travel from her home to mine in Washington state and we will meet.

This 4th of July has taken on a very new and special meaning for me…the 13 colonies may have separated and declared their independence back in 1776 but I am declaring and my proclamation is no amount of time and distance or declaration by our forefathers can separate or divide me from my extended family. We are forever connected not only through DNA but the bond of humanity.

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