Posted in Ancestry, Bride, Brooklyn, Genealogy, Groom, Iasi, Jewish History, New York, Romania, Wedding, Weiss

Rosie Weiss Marries William Levin 1909

In my last posting I wrote about Phillip (Pacey) Weiss (1885 – 1961) who married Sarah Meiselman (1889 – 1965) November 4, 1909, Brooklyn, N.Y. They both had long lives passing within a few years of each other in Chicago, Ill. They were the parents of three children Jeanette (1907 – 1988) , Rachel (1910 – 1913) and Seymour Louis 1916 – 1998) .

Phillip was the brother to Pauline (Polly) and Rose/Rosie Weiss.

In this posting I am concentrating on Rosie Weiss born December 24, 1890, Romania to Samuel Leib Weiss and Mariam (Mary) Shwartz. 

Rosie left Romania and immigrated to New York. I have not been able to find any immigration record for her but according to the NY 1910,1920, and 1930 census, they all report a 1903 immigration year which would make her about 13 years old when she traveled.

Rosie Levin nee Weiss 

RoseWeiss copy

Rosie met William Levin who was born April 5, 1883, Russia. His parents were Abraham Levin and Anna Cohen. Using familysearch.com, I was able to confirm  his parents names along with his death date of June 30, 1948, buried July 1.

 On October 30, 1909, Rosie Weiss married William Levin in Brooklyn, New York.

Weiss&Levin copy

Here is another more casual photo of Rosie and William. I love her little sassy pose with her hand behind her, casually off of her hip.

Weiss16 copy

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A google search for Washington Hall, 93 Thatford Ave led me to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac with a notation under Labor Unions and Organizations and under the sub heading of Textile and Clothing Trades was Washington Hall at the 93 address.

It most certainly had to have been a grand affair, with an evening wedding at 7pm, William in his top hat and tails and Rosie so beautiful in her gorgeous gown with cascading veil off of the fabulous head piece.

But more important to note is Mrs. Mary Weiss, mother of Rosie on the wedding invitation. This certainly indicates her husband Samuel Leib Weiss was deceased and that she was present in New York at the time of her daughters wedding. Family states that Rosie traveled here with her mother. I have not been able to confirm this.

A hint on the invitation was the brides address listed at 46 Lynch St. I did a quick check for the address but unfortunately the building has been torn down. If Mary was truly here perhaps Rosie was living with her mother at this address. I still have not been able to find any record for Mary/Miriam living here, nor have I been able to find where she is buried. Her death date is March 6, 1921 and in my previous post I had shared her  gravestone photo. The question as to who is standing by the grave is still in question. It was shared with us by the great granddaughter of Phillip Weiss and Sarah Meiselman. At this time the my thoughts are that this is Rosie by her mothers grave.

MarianWeissGravestone copy

 

Continuing with the William and Rosie, their first home was at 61 Hopkins Street, Brooklyn, NY. The 1910 census has William (26) working as a house painter. He had arrived in 1890 and it says he was naturalized. Rosie was listed as 23, and living with them was lodger, Mamie Portland (30), working as a laundress in a laundry. Rosie’s age seems to be an error as a birth year of 1890 made her 19 when married and 20 in 1910.

On August 25, 1910 William and Rosie welcomed their first son Samuel.

I could not locate the family in the 1915 census but located William’s WWI 1918 draft registration.  William’s birth date is recorded as April 5, 1883, Rose is listed as his wife and they were living at 339 Central Ave., Brooklyn. His employer was M. Kamenstein @ 135 Pearl St. Brooklyn. Also noted on this record is that William was naturalized on his fathers papers.

WWI Draft Registration William Levin 

World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918AuthorAncestry.com

WilliamLevinWWI

A year  later in 1919 William and Rosie welcomed their second son Norman on April 20th.

Still working as a house painter, William moved his family to 2860 West Sixth Street, they were renting. Interesting on this census was that Rosie was listed as naturalized . Does this mean it was on her own account since William was on his fathers papers, as seen on the WWI document. I could not locate her naturalization record under Rose or Rosie Weiss or Levin.

I do believe I located the ‘Declaration Of Intention’ papers for William. I am not sure what to make of the fact the WWI record said he was under his fathers papers, when this appears to be his record. Lots of interesting information on this but mistakes too. The date on this 1906. His age says 21, with an 1889 birth year. If that were so, it should be 1885. The birth information conflicts with the WWI record but the fact it says his occupation was painter led me to believe this was his record. (I could be wrong) It says he was born in Minsk and last know residence was Ekateriuoslaw, Russia which today is the Ukraine. You can google this read the history. I love that this record has his signature.

Declaration Of Intention

New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1929 Ancestry.com

WilliamLevinNat'l

In 1922 they welcomed their 3rd and last child, a daughter named Marion/Marian and by 1925 they had moved again. Located on the 1925 census under the spelling of Levine, they were now at 2910 W. 36th St between Surf and Mermaid. William’s occupation was listed as tailor which I am sure was a mistake as the 1930 census had him as a painter again. I am sure this was the correct family as all three children were listed, Samuel, Norman and Marion.

Willam with Marion

William holding Marion copy

The 1930 census showed another move to 2917 W. 20th Street. (In my research I have come across many moves for families turning these early years but for some reason this time I am feeling like they really bounced around quite a bit and I can’t help but wonder why) William (44) was renting the place for $60. Under attended school, it says no and yes to able to read and write. Under language, yiddish and yes to speaking English. Under occupation it said painter but this time “own” Under Veteran it said no, so he must not have served in WWI, only registered. Samuel (20) was still at home and working as a painter with Norman (11) and Marion (7)

From the 1940 census William (56) and Rosie (50) had moved his family once again.  The census notes home in 1935 which showed they had moved to the 2868 W. 29th St. address by ’35. Both Samuel (29) and Norman (20)  were working as house painters along with their father. Marion (17) was still home.

Marion and Mom Rosie

Marion and Rosie copy

 

William and Rosie Levin 

William&Rosie copy

If you look very carefully into the car you will see two other people, a child in the middle with a man next to him.

Rosie Levin passed away on February 17, 1946 at the age of 55.

William made one more move that I confirmed with the death information from familysearch.com. It lists his address at the time of death as 2824 W. 30th St. Brooklyn.

William passed away on June 30, 1948. Both are buried at Mount Hebron Cemetery in Queens, New York. A check of the grave sites show that they are buried next each other. (R 81-5-6-17 and W 81-5-6-20) The photo is from FindAGrave.

William Levin

 

* A check for Rosie’s mother Mariam Weiss yield no record for her at Mount Hebron with her daughter and son-in-law.

Thank you to the Brian Morris and Bass families for so graciously sharing their amazing family photos.

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Romania

Samuel Haimowitz and the Missing Immigration Records Update

In my last post I wrote about my continuing search for the missing immigration papers for my great grandfather Samuel, his wife Rebecca and their two sons, Hyman and Pincus. With many questions left open as to when they traveled, who exactly traveled and or who traveled together, I wanted to update with information provided by my cousin Arline. I threw out a life line asking for information and help and she came through.

“Read your recent email and here’s what I remember.  My grandfather was a carpenter in Romania and he had money as that was a prestigious profession.  I was told he came to America to escape the Russian draft.  At that time if you were Jewish and drafted, you went to Siberia.  I was also told he came to this country via Ellis Island with my grandmother and two sons Herman and Paul.  Both Herman and Paul were born in Romania and I think that maybe there were 3 years or so between their ages.  Paul was not born aboard ship.”

The birth date for first born son Hyman/Herman is 22 Sept 1898 and for Pincus/Paul,  3 June 1901, with it listed as 1902 on his death certificate. That year of birth was provided by his daughter and she may not have known for sure. I am using 1901 as the confirmed birth year as that is what is written on his official documents.

With the earliest census record of 1905 for the family taken in June, I will continue to hunt for their immigration record for the years 1901 – 1905 and as a family of 4 coming over together.

Samuels age for immigration is not consistent on his records with the ages 21 – 28 years for arrival. Wife Rebecca’s age is shown as being between 21 – 25 years of age on arrival.

*I have thrown out the year of 1896 for arrival (as seen on the 1930c)

Thank you to my cousin Arline for always being so willing to jump in and help when she can 🙂 It’s is always appreciated.

Posted in Ancestry, Census, Galati, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, New York, Romania, Srulowitz

Samuel Haimowitz and the Missing Immigration Records

Locating the immigration record for my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz feels hopeless at times. Am I making progress or just going over the same old records aimlessly?

I have been trying to locate his immigration record for years now with no success. Family lore recounts that he immigrated with his wife Rebecca along with his son Hyman, 2/3 and infant son Pincus, who may have been born aboard ship. Whether that is true, whether they traveled together has not been proved. In an attempt to recap and revisit and possibly discover something I have missed I am sharing what I know and welcome all suggestions, ideas and help 🙂

Before I go further I want to establish the birth date that I am using for Samuel. It is 15 March 1875. This date comes from his WWI draft registration and from his S.S. application.

005264774_03548Last name written as Himowitz above.

SamHaimowitzSSCardNote his handwriting for his last name.

My earliest record for the family is the 1905 c, spelled Heimowitz, Samuel (28) b. 1877, Romania, Rebecca (25) b. 1880, Romania, son Hyman (8) b. 1898, Romania, Pincus (3)  b. 1902, U.S., Freda (1) living @ 170 Ludlow, NYC. Samuel’s profession was carpenter and Hyman was attending school.

I believe the two records below for petition for citizenship is for my Samuel Haimowitz.  Dated Sept. 24th, 1906, his age was listed as 30 with a birth year of 1876. I have identified this as ‘his’ papers by the occupation listed as Carpenter and the arrival date of 1901 which seems to be the most consistent with the other data found.  Since I could find no other Haimowitz or similar name with occupation of carpenter, this led me to believe that this is for him.

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His arrival date was recorded as ‘on or around’ 12 February 1901, no ship name was given and the spelling of his last name was Haimovich. This interests me as his brother, Marks, who settled in England spelled his name Hyamovitch. Discussions with family in England has included the difference in spelling of the last name and which might have been the original family spelling. Having recorded on this official document the ‘vich’ sound ending, I am leaning towards the England branch spelling being the more original.

007790848_00147

The above 2nd document for Samuels petition for citizenship has a date of 19 February 1904 the name Sam Hymovich, arriving the 12 February 1901, address of 102 Allen St., born in the year 1876. His age was listed as 28. The dates and ages are consistent with the first document. While the name is spelt differently, the arrival day the same, leads me to believe it is the same person. Notice his signature is ‘his mark’ and someone else has spelled the name/written it as Hymovich. The other is 2 year later and it appears he is able to sign his name.

*I have to stop here and report that there are numerous Samuels with birth dates all within a 10 year period along with a variety of spellings. There is another Sam Hymovich born 1877, Russia. I have ruled him out for the above record not belonging to him based on the country of birth and actually locating his naturalization records for the year 1933 along with his wife

Using both the Ellis Island search site, Ancestry, and family search, countless times, using as many spellings and wild cards, more combinations I can think of, I can not find a listing for arrival in 1901, from 1998 – 1905, I can not find any family or single person traveling that could match this family. Using One Step Pages by Stephen Morse, I have identified a number of possible ships arriving the 11th – 13th but that Feb. 12 date could really be outside that box all together. Ships arriving then were the Kaiser Maria Theresia, Havana, Umbria, Potsdam, Tartar Prince & the Capri.  Identifying all these dates and ships on FHL Roll 1403921, I haven’t pursued this further. 

Before going further I can not settle whether Pincus/Paul was born on board ship but I think I can settle the question of whether Pincus/Paul was born in the US or in Romania. All of the census records differ with where he was born and his death certificate says New York, with the information given by the informant, his daughter Annette which could be wrong information. His marriage certificate, S.S. application states, Romania, Galatz. I am going with his Romania as this information was provided by Pincus/Paul himself on official documents. I have no birth certificate for him.

PaulHaimowitzSS

PaulHaimowitzBirthCert

PaulHaimowitzDeathCert

 

 

 

Now if the family arrived on 12 February 1901 and the birth date on the s.s. applications says  3 June, 1901 there is a conflict. In addition notice the date of birth on the death certificate, 3 June 1902, that is after the 1901 arrival as well.

The original quest or question is the location of the immigration records for Samuel, Rebecca, Hyman and Pincus. Believed traveling together, with no records yet found. My thought was establishing where Paul was born could help me find the family traveling. Was I looking for 4 people or 3? Was I look for Samuel alone and Rebecca with 1 or 2 children?

Let me look at the census information.

The 1910c changes a few of the facts and supports the story that Pincus was born either in Romania or Romania waters, on board ship, as his place of birth was listed as Romania and not U.S. as in the 1905c. The family was then living at 228 E. 99th St, NYC.  The immigration year was recorded as 1901 for all 4 of the family, Samuel, Rebecca, Hyman & Pincus. Hyman (10) and Pincus (9).  Freda, now under Fannie was 6 and my grandfather Isidore 4, had been born.

My favorite photo shared with me by my cousin Arline

infantisidor3
Hyman (Herman) Pincus (Paul) Isidore & Freda (Fay) Haimowitz

By 1915 the family had moved again living @ 316 100th St, NYC, Pincus (14)  listed born U.S.. Samuel, Rebecca and Hyman still Romania. Daughter Mollie (4), has joined the family and Sam Shapiro (43) born Russia, cigar maker, was boarding with the them.

Which brings us to 1920 records and the immigration year was listed 1900 for Samuel Rebecca and Pincus, now using Paul (18), was listed as being born in Romania. Samuel’s naturalization year was listed as 1909 with Rebecca and Paul both identified as naturalized also 1909.  If they immigrated in 1900, it appears Paul would not have been born or traveling with them.

Taking a quick glance over at son Hyman in 1920, now going by Herman (21), he was married to Sadie Cantor (20) with an infant son named Harold. His immigration year was noted as 1901 and naturalized 1910. Hermans date of birth, as noted on his WWI draft registration was 22 Sept 1898, Romania. I could not locate a naturalization for Herman or under Hyman. I tried Ancestry, familysearch and Fold3.

1925 c  doesn’t give much information but what it did repeat was Romania for place of birth for Paul but if you look under citizenship Samuel, Rebecca and Paul was marked “a” for alien and not C for citizen. see below

1925c

1930 c really threw me a curve ball. Sam and Rebecca, both in their 50’s said the immigration year was 1896 and that they were both naturalized. Checking on Paul, now married to Ida Taub and living on their own, his place of birth was listed New York again and checking on Herman, his information has the immigration year as 1902 and naturalized.

Wrapping up with the 1940 c which simply says whether naturalized and gives no date of arrival. Samuels says Romania, Na, Hermans says Romania and is coded 4 which is American Citizen born abroad and Pauls says Romania, Na. I have yet to find any naturalization papers for Herman or Paul nor the final papers for Samuel which may show that Herman and Paul naturalized under their father which I suspect was the case and may give additional immigration information.

When did this family arrive in the states? Did they travel together? Did Samuel arrive first and then Rebecca and the children? Where did they depart from? Had they traveled first to England with his brother Marks and his wife Polly and leave from there?

I have asked these questions before, and scoured the records countless times and still have not found any answers.

The only thing I can add is I have had fun trying and as long as I am having fun I will continue to try and track down the answers to these questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, Genealogy, Gropper/Gruber, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Jewish History, Romania

Update on the search for our missing Haimowitz sister ~ a possible lead.

As I continue to work on my missing Haimowitz sister, I had sent away for and received the marriage certificate this past Saturday for a Meyer Gropper and Bessie Heimowitz. Leaving no stone unturned and always hoping for a clue, this certificate left me with more questions than answers but felling hopeful I may be onto something. I was hoping for a last name for Bessie’s mother on this certificate but as you can see, written for both mothers the maiden name is ‘non remember’

The question I was trying to answer with this marriage certificate was could Bessie Heimowitz be the missing sister of Samuel and Marks?

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Recapping what I know: the names of the parents of the ‘missing sister’ would be ‘Hyman’ Haimowitz (as written on brother Samuels SS application) Hyman could also be spelled Chaim/Haim or any additional spelling. As reported on Samuels death certificate by his daughter Fay Lazar, she reported Hyman’s name as Herman. As for Samuels mother her name was listed as Ida Greenblatt/Grunblat, as noted on the SS application and his death certificate.

Question: Could Ida have been known as Yettie or Yetta – we don’t know that.

I turned to Ancestry and familysearch in an attempt to locate anything else that might provide some answers, like a death certificate for this Bessie Heimowitz. Identifying the correct Bessie Heimowitz proved difficult due to duplicate names and similar dates. I found an additional record under the New York Marriage ‘License Index’ and on the  license application for date May 7, 1910, Bessie’s last name was written Himowitz. Going back to her brother Samuel’s WWI draft record his last name was written Himowitz. Also, Samuels last name on the 1905 census is spelled Heimowitz as on the spelling of this marriage certificate above. These kind of spelling mistakes are very common and prove both confusing and frustrating and are no real help most of the time nor does it connect them at this point.

So we have Bessie married to Meyer Gropper which led me to a SS Application and Claims Index  for a Bessie ‘Hymowitch’, clicking on it the spouse was a Meyer Gropper for child Hyman ‘Gruber’ not spelled Gropper – this led me to a WWII draft registration on the 16 Oct. 1940, for Hyman Gruber with Gruber crossed off and rewritten Gropper. Hyman’s birth date was Jan 22, 1914, born St Louis, MO. It listed his home address as 4112 1/2 Whittier Blvd., Los Angeles with his mother Bessie Gruber at the same address.

Bessie Gropper was clearly using the name of Gruber as well and by 1940 they had relocated to the west coast.

I had not been able to find a census record for Bessie and Meyer but here I had her and son in Los Angeles and then another hint from this brought me to a 1925 census in the Bronx. I found Bessie under the spelling of Gruber with her son Hyman and a daughter Yetta living with Morris Siegel, his wife Yetta, son Hyman 19 and daughter Sarah, 12. Bessie is listed as ‘sister’ and not as sister-in-law but I suspect that was a mistake and she was sister to Yetta, Morris Siegels wife. I don’t want go off on to big of a rabbit trail on this,, but I have found enough to make me pause and wonder if Bessie could be the missing sister.  This also would mean that there is possibly an additional sister for Samuel and Marks.

I was unable to find a marriage certificate for Morris Siegel to Yetta/Yettie Haimowitz or any alternative last name spellings but in doing so I was led to a 1910 census record for Morris and “Yettie”.  Morris and Yettie were living in New Jersey, Morris was a carpenter, 30 years old, immigration from Romania in 1890, wife Yettie was 28, born Romania, son also named Hyman was 4 and daughter ‘Ida’ was 2 (known as Sarah on 1925) I am suspecting they were married prior to immigrating here. Also note the name of daughter Ida was the name we are looking for for the mother of our missing sister and here is another son named the same as Samuel and Marks father. Coincidence? Very possibly

Records and dates were very spotting but from what I can piece together, Bessie and Meyer did not remain married. If I have followed the clues correctly Meyer remarried in 1935 a Goldie Weinstein. Together they had 2 children, Micheal and Marilyn Gropper.

I did find a death record for who I believe is this Bessie for Apr 1969, Yuba City, Ca. along with a death record for Hyman/Henry Gruber/Gropper born 22 Jan 1914, St Louis, Mo death May 1977 in Los Angeles  (parents Meyer Gropper and Bessie Hymowitch)

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Romania, Wordless Wednesday

2 Missing Sisters ~ Haimowitz and Strulowitz/Srulowitz

I have welcomed the new year with days of thought on what direction I should go with our family research and am still undecided. The two brick walls however remain standing, one for the missing Haimowitz sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch. The other brick wall is for the missing sister of Samuel’s wife Rebecca Strulowitz/Srulowitz. Both of these woman will remain foremost in my research this year.

Recapping my efforts for missing Haimowitz, I have put a considerable amount of time into finding, actually more like eliminating woman that are not her. I have been looking for Haimowitz woman in a 20 year radius of the two brothers birth years of 1875 and 1880, with a birth between 1870 to 1890. Knowing she did immigrate here from Romania, I am assuming she married here in the states ( NY ) but that could very well not be the case. While her brother Samuel immigrated here, her other brother Marks immigrated to England where he remained along with his branch of the family.  She could very well have gone to England first, married and then immigrated here. It is a long shot in the ‘no stone left unturned’ to investigate. We know from Samuels SS application his parents names were listed as Hyman Haimowitz and Ida Greenblatt. On his death certificate his parents were listed as Herman and Ida. On his headstone his father was written Haim. I am looking for anything that fits into these parameters.

Researched and eliminated this year were

Emma Haimowitz b. 1872 to Harry Haimowitz and Hannah Szumuscoff, Romania married Martin Lugoff, Jan. 1909

Bessy Haimowitz b. 1886 to Louis Haimowitz and Betsy Outler, Russia, married Jacob Sasslovsky, Oct 1908

Ida Haimowitz b. 1882 to Louis Haimowitz and Celia Gold, married Harry Weisberg, March 1902

Sarah Haimowitz b. 1881 to Solomon Haimowitz and Annie Brad, Russia, married Samuel Blum, Dec 1901

Clara Haimowitz b. 1893 to Hersh Haimowitz and Basha Krasner, married Dave Goluskin, June 1916

Ella Haimwitz b. 1883 to Leon Haimowitz and Sophia Moses, married Morris Bloomfield, Jan 1904

Clara Haimowitz married to David Frank, Jan 1903 – I received a no record found when I ordered the marriage certificate.

Eva Haimowitz b.1886 to Solomon Haimowitz and Adel Schwartz, married Hyman Schechter, May 1906

 Jennie Haimowitz b. 1883 to Charles Haimowitz and Yetta Greenberg, married William Babit, Dec 1907

Currently I am working on a Bessie Haimowitz b. 1892 married a Meyer Gropper on 18 June 1910. Checking on familysearch.com I found a marriage record that listed her parents names as Chaim Haimowitz and her mother as Yettie.

As I continue with this process it feels like a needle in haystack but needles have been found. I have two 3/4 cousin DNA matches with Greenblatt but unfortunately neither has responded to a number of requests to correspond – always disappointing.

I do have another lead I am following through with a family member in hopes she can be in touch with a granddaughter of Samuel still living who may remember this great aunt.

I am confident the answer is out there.

In my next post I will update on my progress with the missing Strulowitz sister

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, London, New York, Romania

Our Missing Unknown Haimowitz Sister

I know one day I will be posting “I found her” but not today. My search continues for the missing sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch – (our London Branch)

SamuelHaimowitz6 copy

Unknown sister, Samuel and Freda (daughter of Marks) Bronx (abt. 1950)

This mystery, ‘The mystery of the unknown Haimowitz Sister’ haunts my dreams and wakes me at all hours of the night with search idea’s, whispers of what I may have missed and what I should recheck.

Todays hunt led me to a woman named Ethel Rosenthal. Using familysearch.com, I put into a general search the last name of Haimowitz, an estimate for a birth date based on her brothers ages, along with the known parents last names. Using both mother (Greenblatt) and father (Haimowitz) yielded nothing, a repeat search with simply the father’s last name Haimowitz, about 200 matches came up. From there I began looking for a woman, with a father last name of Haimowitz- first name Hyman.

The idea is; on familysearch, they have a very easy way to view family before looking at the record. In other words I am always looking for a woman who’s records list a father’s name of Hyman Haimowitz and a mother Ida or Edith Greenblatt, any combination or creative spelling of the names. Records are always being added and changes made so I revisit often.

On page 3, I spotted Ethel Rosenthal. Her father was listed as Hiam Hamowitz, mother unknown. Ethel had passed in 1949 at 64, which gave me a birth year of 1885 . This was in my search parameters of 1880 – 1890. Her death was located in Cincinnati, Ohio and while I was looking for a NY death, nothing was out of the question. Checking the record there was a death certificate I was able to view.

record-image_undefined

Could this be our missing sister? I was hopeful, I always am.

Back to ancestry.com I checked the census records and found her married to a Morris Rosenthal with a family of children ages 14 – 0 in the 1920c along with a hint that led me to a marriage certificate for a daughter, Mollie married – Nathan Stein; notice the informant on the death certificate. Another hint led me to an obituary listing in newspapers.com 

4.jpg                American Israelite (Cincinnati, Ohio) . 22 Sept 1949, Thu . Page p9

The anticipation of learning if this was our missing sister was answered, it was not or was it still in question?  There was no mention of Samuel or Marks. Of course the next question could be did ‘they’ have 3 more unknown siblings in this family? A brother Joseph, sister Sara and a Mrs. Ben Richman. Were Samuel and Marks unknown to this branch? A little too far out there to look into. I am feeling confident this is not the sister.

There have been many more hopeful searches in the quest to find our missing sister. Each one has been one of elimination so far which only brings me closer to her.

The hunt continues, hope is alive, the possibilities are endless.

Posted in Casriel Haimowitz, DNA, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Iasi, Jewish History, New York, Odessa, Romania

Mash Letters and Hot Dogs ~ A Haimowitz Connection

 

In my on going search for the sister of my great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz and his brother Marks Hyamovitch, some how I found myself combing newspapers.com for Haimowitz mentions. I had begun my morning going over all my DNA matches looking for a common thread and something must have triggered that plunge down the rabbit hole. It wasn’t long before I began spotting some interesting articles then cross checking on ancestry.

RabbitHoles

This was a case of infidelity by Mrs. Belle Julian Lippner, accused by her husband, Jordan Lippner, described as a self made pure food monarch of Westerchester Co., He was accusing her of having an affair with her ‘six foot caddy’.

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Jordan was accusing his wife of being in the company of other men. But it was some of the terms that caught my interest and kept me reading in this 1929 Daily News article of Nov. 28th.

Jordan accused her of  being a “Pseudo-intellectual, a Bohemian, an advocate of free love. To high brow and “Freudian” in her conversations.”

Belle accused Jordon of having “amnesia when telling her about his life’s history” she went on to say “he was reading to many “hot dog’magazines”.

Justice Joseph Morschauser was not impressed with Belle’s testimony and denied her request for $100 weekly alimony and $500 in her attorney fees. Justice Morschauser reprimanded her on not stopping her lover from writing her “affectionate letters” and went on to say “a wife has no right to receive mash notes.”

Belle, now living with her mother, had been away at ‘summer camp’ and when she had returned home, she told her husband she was with child. It was then he accused her of the unfaithfulness. That is when she left him she said.

Added into evidence were three letters written to Belle by Sidney Haimowitz (b-1910). The 1st letter was dated 24 July 1929 from Island Camp, Craryville, NY; the 2nd from Lake George on 18th of August and a 3rd with no date. In letter number 2 Sidney was excited to be seeing her the following weekend. The letters to Belle seemed so simplistically sweet and I quote the last letter he had written from the article “all day Monday, after you had left, everything I saw and heard reminded me of you, and my heart missed a beat or two, and I thought the craziest things”

Reading the article I found myself routing for a love story between Belle and her caddy Sidney. Belle it seemed to me could be the poster girl for the Flapper generation and for that matter a poster girl for my hippie generation. Had anything really changed?

Getting back to the the ‘hot dog’ magazines that Belle accused her husband Jordon of reading. It’s context led me to believe she was referring to some racy men’s magazine of it’s time and I wasn’t let down. Below is an article that led me down an additional rabbit hole to some of the most interesting reading in some time.

Hot Dogs And Prohibition Smut: Jack Dinsmore’s The Regular Fellows Monthly (1922)

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What happened to Jordon Lippner, wealthy pure food monarch, his wife Belle Julian Lippner and Sidney Haimowitz?  Perhaps a tale for another time but what connects this story is multi DNA connections for me to the family of Sidney Haimowitz back to his grandfather

Casriel (Charles) Haimowitz b. 1844 Romania d. 24 Feb 1917 N.Y.C.  and his wife Ida or Yetta Greenberg b. Apr 1845 Romania d. 1915 N.Y.C.

Casriel’s father was

Hyman Haimowitz and mother Ida Moskowitz both born about 1820 – country unknown

I have long suspected that Casriel holds a key to our family and our MRCA for many of my DNA connections, which has not been easy to prove.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Ancestry, DNA, Familes, Genealogy, Haimowitz, Hyamovitch, Jewish History, London, New York, Romania

The 4th of July 2019

As I welcomed today, this 4th of July,  2019, it began as all others, the usual morning routine; I knew there would be no holiday picnic, no family close by to gather with. There would be late night tv mixed with the dread of bombs bursting in air over our evening sky and we would be up consoling our fur baby and keeping him calm. Then another thought began to surface.

This was the first 4th of July since finding my English ancestors, the first, knowing I had actual family who made their life there in England, the first time to think about the importance and impact of my ancestors choices on mine and my families lives. The first time I would be thinking of and looking at our separation and independence from Great Britain in a totally new light.

My great grandfather Samuel Haimowitz immigrated, arrived and settled in the United States of America sometime between 1900 and 1902 while his brother Marks Hyamovitch arrived in England in 1901 where he settled and established his family. Both of them immigrating from Romania.

 

Samuel and Marks

There are so many questions regarding these two brothers and their choices.  The most obvious for me is why had Samuel chosen America and why had Marks chosen England? Had they traveled from Romania together before Sam left for America? If so why had Marks remained? What had influenced their choices? Was it a financial or personal preference? What had been their relationship prior to their decisions? Both men were carpenters and perhaps they worked together at some point. Their age difference is about 5 years. Sam the oldest born about 1875 and Marks in 1880. It appears as with many families with great distances between them that over the years and generations information and contact between these two families was lost. All these questions and more remain now for those of us who have come after them.

Just last month a cousin, Arline, traveled with her husband from California to London to meet for the first time this branch of cousins. It has been about 70 years since a member of the English branch traveled here to New York. It had been through one lone photo taken at this meeting, that survived with the English branch, that connected us all together again. In just a couple of weeks, Arline, who I too have never met, will travel from her home to mine in Washington state and we will meet.

This 4th of July has taken on a very new and special meaning for me…the 13 colonies may have separated and declared their independence back in 1776 but I am declaring and my proclamation is no amount of time and distance or declaration by our forefathers can separate or divide me from my extended family. We are forever connected not only through DNA but the bond of humanity.

one-family